September 16, 2019
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Worker Protection from Exploitation

Economic and Social Council: United Nations Development Programme

Topic: Worker Protection from Labor Exploitation

While labor exploitation is a broad and often disagreed upon topic, it often involves bad working conditions, excessive hours, poor wages, hazardous conditions, and a lack of respect for labor laws and previously agreed upon contracts. The beginnings of international cooperation related to labor trace back to the end of the First World War, where the Treaty of Versailles established the International Labor Organization on the belief that a lasting peace would only be accomplished with a commitment to social justice. The United Nations Development Programme’s establishment in 1965 reflected a broader philosophy: that developing nations and improving the standard of living was inherent to maintaining peace. Partnerships between the UNDP and the ILO have reflected the inherent connection between the rights of workers and the standard of living, and with a recent backsliding of the protections of workers worldwide, it is imperative that the United Nations Development Programme act against labor exploitation in the modern era.

Worker exploitation is present at all levels of national development. The International Labor Organization estimates that 50 million people are currently subject to forced labor or modern day slavery. The COVID-19 pandemic, the rise of natural disasters due to climate change, and the impact of artificial intelligence and automation on jobs, are just a few factors that have significantly impacted the availability of jobs. In addition, migrants and refugees are susceptible to labor exploitation as their legal status relies on their employment. As a result of all of these factors, the most vulnerable people in society are more likely to accept lower wages and worse working conditions. These issues represent a small portion of issues that the United Nations Development Programme can consider in a resolution addressing worker protection from labor exploitation.

While it is primarily the goal of the International Labor Organization to address existing instances of labor exploitation, the United Nations Development Programme is responsible for establishing standards that promote worker protections as nations develop. Given the broad nature of the topic at hand, delegates must work together to consider what issues within labor exploitation should be prioritized in any resolution written. Each UN member nation faces its own unique labor market, and delegates should consider the factors that impact the country they represent, as well as the needs of other states. The committee should consider what some of the root causes of labor exploitation are, and what sorts of actions governments can take to address these root causes. The committee ought to consider how its actions can encourage the development of nations and aid in the building of better lives across the globe in any resolution written.

Useful Links:

UNDP on Contemporary Slavery

https://www.undp.org/sites/g/files/zskgke326/files/2021-09/UNDP-Corruption-and-Contemporary-Forms-of-Slavery-Relationships-and-Addressing-Policy-Gaps.pdf

ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights At Work

https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_norm/—declaration/documents/normativeinstrument/wcms_716594.pdf

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Submitted Position Papers

FHEDelegates 11/22/2023 18:37:39 98.209.80.131

Topic:
Country: United Kingdom
Delegate Name: Abby Huffman

Labor Exploitation is all too prevalent in recent society, as the International Labor Organization estimates that 49.6 million people were subject to modern slavery in 2021. Of that 49.6 million, 27.6 million people were forced into labor while the other 22 million were forced into marriage. To make matters worse, the situation is further deteriorating. Approximately 10 million more people are reported to experience modern slavery today than five years ago. Moreover, it is important to establish that 86% of forced labor occurs in the private sector, highlighting the necessity of commercial regulation. 23% of all forced labor comes in the form of sexual exploitation, which is at the expense of women and young girls four out of five times. Additionally, 3.3 million children are subjected to poor and forced labor, and 50% of those children are also forced into commercial sexual exploitation. Immigrants also face labor exploitation, often through human trafficking, at disproportionate rates; a migrant worker is three times more likely to be forced into labor than a native worker. To combat these issues, the ILO, a UN agency, adopted the 2014 Protocol to the Forced Labour Convention, 1930. Its purpose, in the words of Amelia Espejo of the International Organisation of Employers, is “to take a more comprehensive approach to forced labor by focusing on prevention, protection and remedy issues which were not addressed by the Forced Labour Convention in 1930”. However, this effort does not go far enough. The United Kingdom calls upon the UNDP to clearly establish workers’ rights and to improve the socio-economic standings of women, children, and migrants to prevent greater labor exploitation from occurring.

The United Kingdom has made various major efforts to tackle labor exploitation in its own country. In the Health and Safety at Work Act of 1974, the UK created the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Similar to the American equivalent Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the HSE is a national, independent watchdog organization—serving as the UK’s main health and safety regulator. The HSE is entrusted with enacting and enforcing legislation aimed at preventing workplace accidents, injuries, illnesses, and deaths. It also provides guidance to employers on how to comply with health and safety laws, free resources, and any changes to new legislation regarding worker protection. As both the HSE in the United Kingdom and OSHA in the United States (and many other national organizations across the globe) have seen tremendous success in improving workplace safety standards in their respective nations, the UK would like to see a similar institution created or improved upon within the UN. Such an agency would require employers to create and publish workplace safety policies, provide financial incentives to companies who comply with the standards instituted by the UNDP, and suggest potential consequences for workers and human rights violations. As a regulator, a global version of the HSE could ensure the bettering of working conditions in developing and developed countries alike. Funding can be garnered from the UN Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery (UN Slavery Fund) and NGOs like World Vision, Global March Against Child Labor, and many more. It is also of the utmost importance that the UNDP address economic and social inequalities that lead to many people in forced labor or accepting poor working conditions. The illegal trafficking of people into modern-day slavery in the UK is more common than one may expect, and almost all those trafficked come from overseas. The United Kingdom is committed to improving its treatment of migrant workers, and providing more support to them once they escape trafficking or forced labor. Promoting migrants in social and financial aspects will protect them in work, as well as reduce discrimination in the global job market. Finally, an essential part of worker protection is fair wages and working hours. The United Kingdom has the third highest minimum wage in Western Europe and continues to adjust it to compete with inflation. Furthermore, the UK prevents corporations from requiring employees to work more than 48 hours on average per week.

While the United Kingdom is not exempt from issues regarding worker protection, it has taken significant steps in regulating workplace health and safety violations as well as decreasing social, economic, and ethnic discrimination that lead to unsafe conditions for workers. On an international scale, the UK would like to see a resolution that supports the improvement of conditions for immigrants, establishes global standards and regulations for workers’ rights, and provides financial incentives, assistance, and resources to certain nations and corporations. Because labor exploitation occurs in so many nations, and many other nations profit from it, a global solution must be implemented to ensure the future protection and prosperity of the working class.

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RoyalOakDelegate 11/22/2023 17:38:52 68.36.250.211

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Algeria
Delegate Name: Giselle Green

The pervasive issue of labor exploitation is pressing and poses a global threat. 50 million people as of today are still being subject to forced labor. According to the International Labour Organization, the definition of forced labor is, “all work or service which is exacted from any person under the threat of a penalty and for which the person has not offered himself or herself voluntarily.” Labor exploitation can be enforced by private and public companies and individuals. It can also happen to people ranging from children to adults in a variety of industries. One of the major victims of forced labor are people in poverty. Many either do it for fast money or are forced into it. Many enterprises or individuals entertain forced labor because it provides a profit and workers when companies lack employees. Labor exploitation can end up having a negative impact on the economy. Despite seeming to benefit the economy due to high consumption rates, there is a lack of investment and a strong correlation between forced labor and the exhaust of natural resources. Labor exploitation only results in economic, environmental and social disadvantages. In 2014, the ILO updated and created legislation against the exploitation of people. Not to mention, The Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, 1930 and the Forced Labour (Supplementary Measures) Recommendation, 2014 (No. 203) were put in place. This was a great stride in the fight to prevent forced labor around the world.
As the delegate representing Algeria, we strongly believe that all possible measures should be taken to eradicate labor exploitation everywhere. The UN, ILO and the UNDP have all made important advances in ending labor exploitation, but we hope to contribute to the complete removal of it. Forced labor was an issue in Algeria through human trafficking, but we have since then put measures in place to decrease and end this problem. Algeria’s first step to getting rid of labor exploitation in our country was establishing the National Trafficking In Persons (TIP) Committee. They have worked closely with The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) researching and discussing the best framework that would attack labor exploitation from multiple angles. A project to tackle the consequences of human trafficking and labor exploitation was established starting in late 2021. This consisted of support and involvement from the United Kingdom, Algeria, the UNODC, the National TIP Committee and various law officials from the eastern region of Algeria. The purpose of this event was to come to a collective agreement on the most efficient way to go forward with the punishment of labor exploitation. A few ways we discussed handling this issue were increased and strengthened labor inspectors, both public and private industry prevention, support of the victims through mental health organizations, and much more. According to the U.S. Department of State, the initiative we took proved effective as our government reported about a 33% reduction in human trafficking cases from the year this action was implemented compared to now.
After experiencing firsthand the positive effects of collaboration and organized legislation to reduce labor exploitation, Algeria would love to propose ways to make this framework large-scale. The first major step that will need to be taken is collaboration. Unless everyone is on a similar page, it will be hard to fully eliminate labor exploitation for everyone. Legislation is stronger when multiple nations have a say and can contribute ideas that will help benefit other countries and their own. Because Algeria had so much support from multiple UN vessels and legislators in their own country, we were able to create such a strong plan against exploitation. Another idea that was previously stated was the fact that this legislation was supported on so many levels. Not only was there prevention in place for reducing labor exploitation in the form of committees, legislation, and human rights organizations, but we also covered other problems that can arise due to the major issue. Social matters such as the safety and mental health of the victims were discussed as well. All in all, Algeria expresses its full support of a resolution that would tackle this issue on multiple levels and with the insight and joint effort of the other nations in this committee.

Works Cited:

“What Are Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking? (Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking).” What Are Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking? (Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking), International Labour Organization, www.ilo.org/global/topics/forced-labour/definition/lang–en/index.htm. Accessed 20 Nov. 2023.

“Algeria – United States Department of State.” U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of State, 27 Mar. 2023, www.state.gov/reports/2022-trafficking-in-persons-report/algeria/. Accessed 20 Nov. 2023.

Yemen Food Security Response and Resilience Project Updated Labor …, www.undp.org/sites/g/files/zskgke326/files/2023-02/labor_management_procedures-fsrrp.pdf. Accessed 20 Nov. 2023.

Forced Labour: Does It Make Economic Sense? – United Nations University, collections.unu.edu/eserv/UNU:3293/JRF01_ForcedLabour.pdf. Accessed 20 Nov. 2023.

Author links open overlay panelJessica L. Decker Sparks 1, et al. “Growing Evidence of the Interconnections between Modern Slavery, Environmental Degradation, and Climate Change.” One Earth, Cell Press, 19 Feb. 2021, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2590332221000610. Accessed 20 Nov. 2023.

“Algeria: A Great Step towards Ending Human Trafficking for Labor Exploitation Purposes.” United Nations : UNODC ROMENA, www.unodc.org/romena/en/Stories/2021/March/algeria_-a-great-step-towards-ending-human-trafficking-for-labor-exploitation-purposes.html. Accessed 20 Nov. 2023.

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Trevor Riley 11/22/2023 16:30:28 174.162.60.153

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Canada
Delegate Name: Matthew Gascon

Labor exploitation is unfortunately a huge problem in various parts of the world. The UN has witnessed and condemned the cruel treatment of workers. The exploitation of workers through methods like awful wages and cruel working conditions is inhumane and creates a negative socioeconomic environment for everyone involved. Worker exploitation creates lasting impacts on not just the workers but any family or friends they’re trying to support with their labor.

Canada has extensive protections for our workers. Workers have a constitutional right to strike in Canada. Canada has strong protections against any discrimination based on race or sex. Canada has a general 40-hour standard workweek limit, with overtime at 1.5x pay being required past that. Canada requires employers to provide benefits such as the Canadian Pension Plan, and employment insurance in case finding work becomes hard due to health or family reasons(including 15 weeks of guaranteed maternity leave). These and many other measures ensure employees have a great work-life balance and are not exploited by employers.

Canada recognizes that national sovereignty allows for nations to have needed flexibility in deciding what will be best for their citizens. However, we and many other nations have found that guaranteeing benefits such as insurance for health/family situations provides a healthier environment allowing workers to be more productive and happier in a less stressful environment. Additionally, nations should allow striking as despite the short-term disruption, a nation’s workforce will be much happier and more productive when they feel they are working under fair terms and conditions.

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FHEDelegates 11/22/2023 16:04:49 24.127.84.79

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Kazakhstan
Delegate Name: Shyla Chadda

Labor exploitation is associated with cruel treatment and hazardous conditions of workers. It goes against basic human rights. This is often caused by poverty and corruption in a community. Exploiting labor can result in negative physical and mental health. Poor wages keep these employees in the pit of poverty while negatively impacting the economy. The Asia and Pacific region contains 15.1 million people forced into labor which is the greatest amount compared to elsewhere. The Fair Labor Association states that “workers shall have the right to enter into and to terminate their employment freely.” Additionally, The International Labour Organization explains that they “Now have the opportunity to ratify the Protocol and integrate new measures at the national and regional levels to combat this crime.”

Kazakhstan has been trying to abolish this crime of labor exploitation by increasing funding for support shelters and collaborating with NGOs. The Kazakh government has taken steps to train higher authorities to investigate and prosecute these crimes. In 2021, Kazakhstan granted $304,830 to trafficking shelters that assisted the victims. However, the officials’ efforts became insufficient as the President signed a law in 2023 discontinuing unannounced inspections unless a complaint or supporting evidence is given. This is bad because undetected crimes such as child labor are easier to get away with due to the lack of announced inspection. According to the Walk Free Foundation, in 2016, around 81,600 victims were forced into labor. Kazakhstan was rated one of the top 10 worst countries for workers by the ITUC. However, improvements are in the process of being regulated. The NAP for Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labor called attention to the creation of policies against child labor, programs to watch endangered communities, supporting children who have been victims, and raising awareness about the issue of worker exploitation. The Kazakh government has funded and shown support for programs that prevent child labor. In 2022, The Twelve Days Against Child Labor campaign funded by the government along with NGOs made over 7,100 joints to inspect over 10,300 sites. The national campaign reached over 900,000 kids and 420,000 employers. Unfortunately, there are gaps within these programs that reveal poor efforts to follow through with the goal.

Kazakhstan proposes a stronger approach to address the issue of labor exploitation. Kazakhstan recommends reinforcing programs that detect these problems such as forced labor, child labor, and human trafficking. Unfair treatment of employees not only takes advantage of human rights but also affects social and economic development. Countries that have been in similar situations should contribute to helping this issue and support endorsing these programs. Kazakhstan has understood the cons of worker exploitation in the past and looks forward to working on the pros of worker protection in the future.

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FHEDelegates 11/22/2023 15:52:11 24.127.84.79

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: India
Delegate Name: Sabrina Green

Labor exploitation is when businesses purposely exploit workers in many ways. Such businesses that do this include agriculture, manufacturing, and construction. These companies exploit workers through human trafficking, low to no wages, and long working hours. Many people who experience these challenges are people in debt, people who struggle to make ends meet, and young children. Around 60% of citizens are in debt, and about 3,253,202 children in India work. These people have no choice but to continue working under these poor conditions because they have to work to support their families. Labor exploitation typically occurs in developing countries because these are the places that have such groups of people.

India is one of the main countries with exploited work as a main system for work. The country has many factories due to exports being a strong score of income for this country. Because the country has such a huge population, it’s hard to closely regulate factories and companies. India has about a 2.14USD minimum wage, however many are paid less. India is also a country where human trafficking can be found. Although India doesn’t have all the precautions to prevent these actions from happening, they are looking for ways to fix this huge problem. India is currently in Tier Two (in the human trafficking tier in the USA) for human trafficking. Indian states such as Maharashtra and Odisha have funded AHTU (anti-human trafficking unit) to prevent these unfortunate events from occurring. Many factories in India have very poor working situations, for example, many factories collapse due to not enough mandatory factory setting checks. A government report shows that most workers earn less than half of the minimum accepted norms, 71% do not have any written job contract, 54% do not get paid leave, and over 57% in rural areas and nearly 80% in urban areas work much beyond the eight-hour work day.

Although India has exploitation and trafficking, India is trying to improve. India has already taken precautions to help improve these factors that enable it. India also wants to help improve conditions for all countries. A way to help get rid of labor exploitation is by having more regulation over factories globally. What a UN sub-committee could do is gain people to go to countries to help regulate factories. India recommends another thing this UN committee could take care of is making AHTU (anti-human trafficking unit) through fundraisers to help prevent human trafficking such as A21. This money could help tighten regulations on improper factories and help build defenses against large human trafficking groups.

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FHEDelegates 11/22/2023 15:09:21 24.127.84.79

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Brazil
Delegate Name: Hope Orban

The International Labor Organization, or ILO, estimates that 50 million people are currently subject to forced labor or modern day slavery. Labor exploitation of all ages, genders, and ethnicities is taking place around the globe today. Unfortunately, it is not on a positive track. Global disasters like the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change coupled with human factors like artificial intelligence and intense migration policies are all aiding in the uptick of exploitative labor practices. The dynamics between first world consumer countries and third world producing countries is deeply complex and operates on an unjust system that cannot be easily changed. Many people faced with exploitative labor practices work in such conditions because they have no other opportunity to earn money to survive. The first step to addressing issues that exploit workers or lessen economic opportunity like sex trafficking, child labor, forced labor, and poor working conditions is to recognize them and find direct causes. The UNDP must aid in establishing and implementing standards that can address the currently expanding world of worker exploitation and protect affected parties.

Although it faces many inequalities and enormous challenges related to human rights, Brazil is seeking to become more equal and fair to its citizens. Slavery is illegal in Brazil. A type of slavery, “debt slavery,” still exists in rural areas, however it is illegal and the government seeks to end it. However, despite the current administration’s goals to end this type of servitude, more work must be done to ensure that policies like this do not occur. Under Brazilian law, 16 is the minimum age to enter the labor market and 14 is the minimum age to work as an apprentice. However, according to data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), more than 2.7 million minors between the ages of 5 and 17 worked in the country in 2015. This startling statistic reveals the current less than favorable situation of child labor in Brazil. Typically, children are forced to work in the agricultural sectors. At worst, children face sexual exploitation and face human trafficking. Young women are especially at risk; Brazil has a high rate of gender-based violence against women with 3.5 per 100,000 women falling victim. Bolivian and other migrant workers face discrimination, unfair policies, and unfair labor practices because of their lack of choice and power. The COVID-19 pandemic has worsened all aspects of exploitative labor. Increasing economic stability led to more desperation and poverty, creating a perfect environment for exploitative labor practices to worsen. The Brazilian government has made it a priority to end child labor and other harmful institutions that put workers at risk for exploitation. 2017 was an important year for the country’s labor policies: Brazil ratified and subsequently implemented labor law amendments and additions. National plans implemented by the country since then and at present include: the National Plan to Combat Sexual Violence Against Children and Adolescents, the National Plan for the Eradication of Forced Labor, and the National Education Plan. All detailed goals for the end of labor exploitation and the propagation of a new generation of protected workers. The current government was able to raise the minimum wage 90 Brazilian reals in May 2023. The Brazilian populace, including celebrities, are involved in campaigns calling for the end of specifically child labor on mostly social media.

Protecting workers from exploitative labor is a multifaceted issue that will take a great volume of policies and reforms to fix. All countries suffer from similar injustices but for many different reasons. The challenge to solving this crisis will be difficult; policies must work for all involved countries. Causes must be individually addressed for all countries to come together to make a better future for all. If Sustainable Goal 8 is to be met globally, action must be taken as soon as possible. Brazil urges the UN to come to agreements on how to help and maintain unfair labor policy with all countries through the help of NGOs and preexisting or soon to be created subcommittees and initiatives.

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Celia Kaechele 11/22/2023 13:52:29 76.192.146.195

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Jordan
Delegate Name: Gavin Dakhi

Labor exploitation poses a large challenge to global development, encompassing issues such as poor working conditions, extended work hours, insufficient wages, hazardous environments, and a disregard for established labor norms. Jordan recognizes the urgency of devising comprehensive strategies to combat labor exploitation, creating sustainable development and striving to uphold human rights.

The International Labor Organization, established after the First World War through the Treaty of Versailles, laid the foundation for international cooperation on labor rights. Grounded in the belief that lasting peace is linked to social justice for all, the International Labor Organization has been vocal in advocating for workers’ rights. The following creation of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in 1965 underscores the commitment to improving living standards and working standards as a necessity.

Recent estimates from the International Labor Organization indicate that approximately 50 million individuals (about twice the population of Texas) globally are ensnared in forced labor. The complexities of this issue have been worsened by the compounding effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, escalating natural disasters fueled by climate change, and the transformative impact of artificial intelligence and automation on employment dynamics. Vulnerable populations, including migrants and refugees, are disproportionately affected due to their legal status often being tied to employment and where they can become employed.

While the International Labor Organization primarily focuses on resolving existing instances of labor exploitation, the UNDP plays an important role in establishing standards that fortify worker protections during national development. Jordan emphasizes the importance of a comprehensive strategy that navigates the diverse challenges within the crisis of labor exploitation.

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Celia Kaechele 11/22/2023 13:45:38 76.192.146.195

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Turkey
Delegate Name: Evan Puzzuoli

Worker exploitation is one of the biggest issues currently. Workers will be forced to work in dangerous conditions with minimal compensation. Children may also be forced to work in these conditions. The main issue with worker exploitation is the disrespect toward humans. Widely accepted labor laws date back to the Treaty of Versailles the late 1910’s. With the availability of jobs decreasing, people in need will work for less out of desperation. Some might even consider the exploitation of workers as a form of slavery. Every human has rights, and the exploitation of those rights is unacceptable and needs to be solved. This issue of worker exploitation is getting worse by the day and needs to be solved as soon as possible.

In Turkey, child labor is prevalent in low numbers. In 2017, Tukey had roughly a 55 percent employment rate. Out of that 55 percent of the population most are earning very low pay. Turkey’s productivity from labor is very high. However, the amount of low performing students is very high which is a contribution to labor exploitation. There are many labor unions in Turkey dating back to 1947. However, strikes are legal in Turkey, in the past the government has taken to force to prevent and end the strikes. Turkey has taken measures to improve the current status of worker exploitations by joining the International Labour Organization. In the past Turkey has banned striking from those who work in fields that are essential for society.

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Celia Kaechele 11/22/2023 13:32:22 76.192.146.195

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Japan
Delegate Name: Oscar Vartanian

Worker protection from labor exploitation is an extremely broad and highly disagreed upon topic. Worker protection includes safe working environments, prevention of excessive working hours, and enforcement of international labor laws. In many nations around the world, these international labor laws are still not enforced, creating dangerous work environments, low wages, and extreme working hours. This lack of enforcement has resulted in millions of people being stuck in indentured servitude and results in nearly 343 people dying each day.

Japan recognizes the dire nature of the current labor environment and believes itself to be a leader in workers’ rights and compensation. Japan remains committed to upholding a progressive and safe work environment, with many laws and restrictions protecting workers’ rights. Japan to this day continues to advance its labor laws and worker protection. Japan encourages communication between workers and employers and hopes they can address issues before they arise.

Labor exploitation is an international problem and is an issue present all over the world. Japan believes international collaboration is necessary to address many of the issues today. Japan actively participates in international forums such as the International Labor Organization (ILO), to ensure safe and healthy practices and to create a safe and efficient work environment. By utilizing international communication, it will hold many nations accountable for these actions.

The Global Supply chain presents a major problem when it comes to workers’ rights. Often, they find ways around many labor laws and regulations. Japan’s government actively works with many of its large organizations and encourages them to ensure workers’ rights and safe practices. Japan is in support of forming and utilizing international guidelines and enforcing them to hold international organizations accountable.

Migrant workers are a vulnerable group often in need of work and are consistently taken advantage of. Japan recognizes their vulnerability and feels they need to be protected. Migrant workers typically are refugees or people desperate for work. Japan believes that the UNDP needs to work closely with member states on protecting and ensuring the safety of migrant workers.

Currently, international labor laws are too broad and not being enforced. Japan believes the UNDP needs to put in place and enforce these labor laws instead of letting them go unnoticed. Implementing and strengthening domestic policies, and encouraging good business practices will help in many ways.

The current state of worker exploitation is not acceptable. Japan encourages the UNDP to act and help these people. Implementing new domestic policies and enforcing others will go a long way in fixing the problems at hand. Along with more protection from migrant workers and monitoring the Global supply chain it will change the current state of the problems at hand.

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WilliamstonDelegates 11/22/2023 13:30:23 74.199.24.79

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Denmark
Delegate Name: Juliet Guenther

Delegate: Juliet Guenther
School: Williamston High School
Country: Kingdom of Denmark
Committee: UNDP
Topic: Worker Protection from Labor Exploitation

Labor exploitation has been an issue in every country for as long as society has existed. If this issue doesn’t get the attention it deserves, people will be paid less, and have worse working conditions that can result in increased deaths in the workplace. This issue is getting worse in even developed countries as issues like COVID-19, worsening natural disasters, and increasing use of AI in the workspace cause people to lose jobs. When unemployment increases people are more likely to take on exploitative jobs as they are desperate for income. This problem is present from the bottom of the barrel up to Wall Street, it cannot go unaddressed.
The Kingdom of Denmark has had a long history of Unions protecting our people’s rights. This land is world renowned for the rights of its workers and has been a very active partner of the International Labour Organization (ILO). The Kingdom of Denmark has shown its cooperation and eagerness to further worker’s rights on the international stage. This is proven by the ILO themselves “Denmark has ratified all ten Fundamental Conventions, the four Priority Conventions, and 59 Technical Conventions” (ILO). The Kingdom of Denmark has put the protection of our workers on such importance.
The Kingdom of Denmark believes in finding innovative solutions to tackle problems, and we want to help countries across the world find ways to protect their workers from exploitation. The Kingdom of Denmark will definitely look to other European Union countries for help in the construction of a healthy resolution paper. The ideal paper for the Kingdom of Denmark would put heavy importance on regulating and enforcing regulations across a nation.
The Kingdom of Denmark will do what they can to promote other countries to protect their workers from exploitation.

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WilliamstonDelegates 11/22/2023 13:19:06 98.97.2.135

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Denmark
Delegate Name: Juliet Guenther

Delegate: Juliet Guenther
Committee: UNDP
Topic: Worker Protection from Labor Exploitation

Labor exploitation has been an issue in every country for as long as society has existed. If this issue doesn’t get the attention it deserves, people will be paid less, and have worse working conditions that can result in increased deaths in the workplace. This issue is getting worse in even developed countries as issues like COVID-19, worsening natural disasters, and increasing use of AI in the workspace cause people to lose jobs. When unemployment increases people are more likely to take on exploitative jobs as they are desperate for income. This problem is present from the bottom of the barrel up to Wall Street, it cannot go unaddressed.
The Kingdom of Denmark has had a long history of Unions protecting our people’s rights. This land is world renowned for the rights of its workers and has been a very active partner of the International Labour Organization (ILO). The Kingdom of Denmark has shown its cooperation and eagerness to further worker’s rights on the international stage. This is proven by the ILO themselves “Denmark has ratified all ten Fundamental Conventions, the four Priority Conventions, and 59 Technical Conventions” (ILO). The Kingdom of Denmark has put the protection of our workers on such importance.
The Kingdom of Denmark believes in finding innovative solutions to tackle problems, and we want to help countries across the world find ways to protect their workers from exploitation. The Kingdom of Denmark will definitely look to other European Union countries for help in the construction of a healthy resolution paper. The ideal paper for the Kingdom of Denmark would put heavy importance on regulating and enforcing regulations across a nation.
The Kingdom of Denmark will do what they can to promote other countries to protect their workers from exploitation.

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EastGrandRapidsDelegates 11/21/2023 17:37:26 98.97.3.230

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Spain
Delegate Name: Helen Engbers

Worker exploitation is classified as unsafe working conditions, poor hours, substandard wages, and a disregard for labor laws. Overall it is the abuse of a person by the company they work for, mentally, or physically. Spain is moving in the right direction by putting in some labor laws for the protection of full-time and part-time employees, such as protection against unfair dismissal, a guaranteed minimum wage, and the right to collective bargaining. They are also Securing benefits for workers such as paid leaves and Social Security among other things. While Spain is making worker protection from exploitation a priority there are still places in the country that need more work, an example of worker exploitation is the Spanish cities of Almería and Huelva.

This agricultural region boomed around 20 years ago by using migrant workers who farm over half of Europe’s produce which results in the company making over 1.5 billion US dollars a year. Unfortunately, the company doesn’t share their profits with the migrant farmhands who only make $40 a day. A group of 3,000 Moroccan women travel every year to Huevla where they harvest strawberries just to work excessive hours and are paid below minimum wage. A report done by Ethical Consumer found that the companies in Almería and Huelva were violating labor laws in Spain such as forced labor, union busting, excessive hours, unsafe working conditions, payment less than minimum wage, discrimination, sexual harassment, and inhumane treatment. Spain disregarded the findings and funded a statement in 2022 that said “The miracle of Spanish food exports would not exist without labor exploitation.” The local government also knows about the unfair treatment that goes on and pays no attention to it.

While Spain has fair labor laws they should spend more time enforcing them in situations like Almería and Huelva and just in general. If worker protection from exploitation does not become more of a priority for countries it will become increasingly unsafe, and dangerous and could build and become an even more life-threatening case like slavery or servitude. I believe we can still keep people safe and healthy while maintaining a consistent stream of income from the agriculture movement in Almería and Huelva. For the people of Spain, I believe it is in Spain’s best interest to recognize the urgency of this issue. With Spain on board, I believe they can help the UN to minimize the estimated 50 million people this issue affects. We can achieve this by setting a high standard for the Future Leaders of the world to set and enforce labor laws that keep the working class safe and healthy.

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Kaycee Duffey 11/22/2023 11:26:37 174.162.43.107

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Ukraine
Delegate Name: Aanya Dogra

Committee: United Nations Development Programme
Topic: Worker Protection from Labor Exploitation
Country: Ukraine
Delegate: Aanya Dogra, Forest Hills Northern High School

Labor exploitation has been prevalent throughout the entire globe: it is a violation of human rights. The history of labor exploitation is deeply rooted in economic changes and political conflict. Modern conflict, especially due to COVID-19, has placed a setback in combating labor exploitation. Addressing this is crucial to creating sustainable, fair, and responsible economic systems.
The current Labor Code of Ukraine was adopted in 1971 when Ukraine was still part of the Soviet Union which included laws about working hours, holidays, rest periods, wages, overtime, leave, and termination of employment. Ukraine plans to adopt a new labor code in 2023. In Ukraine, employers have a legal obligation to not use forced labor. Yet, The 2023 Global Slavery Index (GSI) estimates that on any given day in 2021, 559,000 people were living in modern slavery in Ukraine. However, this was before the invasion led by The Russian Federation. This conflict limited our capacity to reduce labor exploitation, especially in the Russian-controlled areas of Donetsk and Luhansk. Russian aggression in Ukraine created more than 1.4 million IDPs, 190,000 of which were children. These children are especially vulnerable to exploitation. Child labor in Ukraine mainly consists of performing dangerous tasks in mining and producing pornography. Individuals are also exploited in forced begging, construction, manufacturing, and agriculture. Russia continues to separate Ukrainian children from their parents and illegally transfer them to camps in Russia, which may be used for child labor.
To combat modern-day slavery, USAID has collaborated with the IOM, the Ukrainian government, and local civil society organizations (CSOs) to prevent human trafficking. Ukraine, in partnership with the International Labour Organization, works to teach employers how to prevent the use of forced labor in everyday operations of their companies through the following Guiding Principles: 1) freedom of employment; 2) freedom to terminate employment; 3) prevention of a threat of violence, harassment, and intimidation; 4) prohibition of coercion in wage payment; 5) prohibition of disciplinary measures against a worker as a ground for continued employment; 6) prevention of the use of overtime as a means of coercion to work; 7) guaranteed freedom of movement; 8) prevention of the use of skills development and vocational training as a means of coercion to work.
Ukraine believes that protecting workers from labor exploitation is essential to creating viable, well-organized, and ethical economic systems. Outside factors may include warfare, disease, and economic turmoil. Ukraine wishes to lower labor exploitation all around the world and calls on every nation to put an end to this issue. Ukraine looks forward to working with other countries on this topic.

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Kaycee Duffey 11/22/2023 11:25:18 73.161.145.90

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Cuba
Delegate Name: Simon Rothstein

UN Development Program
Worker Protection from Labor Exploitation
Cuba
Simon Rothstein. Forest Hills Northern High School

Workers’ rights have been exploited and protected across the world since the beginning of time. From enslavement to union strikes, workers’ rights have seen both sides of exploitation.
Many countries consider the protection of workers to be of utmost importance, as their work supports the entire nation. Yet, others take advantage of their workers for the same reason; however, they want to support the country through forced or unjust labor. Since the adoption of a socialist economic system, replacing its old capitalist one, Cuba has recognized the importance of safeguarding workers’ rights and protecting them from labor exploitation.
Before the revolution, Cuba faced widespread labor exploitation under authoritarian regimes. The Cuban Revolution sought to eliminate these inequalities, leading to the establishment of labor reforms and the Cuban Workers’ Central (CTC), a union for protecting workers’ rights. In 1959, right after Castro rose to power, he passed the Agrarian Reform Act, which made foreign ownership of Cuban farmland illegal. Now, the peasants who previously worked on that land took ownership of it. The same year, the Labor Code of 1959 was passed, protecting workers’ rights by addressing workers’ hours, conditions, and wages and emphasizing the right for workers to participate in unions. In 1961, Castro declared Cuba a socialist nation, which inherently strengthened lower class worker’s rights compared to the previous capitalist state of the country. Several nationalization laws were put in place to give control of foreign-owned businesses to Cuba, thus eradicating capitalist exploitation. The Law on Social Security in 1963 provided benefits to workers such as healthcare, disability benefits, and pensions. These further protected workers from exploitation based on their health, disabilities, or age.
As Cuba has experienced both ends of the labor exploitation spectrum, it is confident in the belief that complete worker protection from labor exploitation is of utmost importance. Cuba ratified the Right to Organize and Collective Bargaining Convention to protect worker unions from anti-union discrimination, the Rural Workers’ Organizations to promote agrarian workers’ rights, and the Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organize to further protect labor rights. The ratification of these conventions demonstrates Cuba’s complete devotion to the protection of workers from labor exploitation.
Cuba’s pursuit of the expansion of worker protection from labor exploitation emphasizes the importance of workers’ representation through unions, the attention to new rising problems for which amendments must be made to properly protect workers’ rights, the worldwide extension of awareness of workers’ rights and their significance, and the recognition that economic growth and change must be mutually beneficial: both to the workers and to the growing business or organization. Through these initiatives, Cuba hopes to contribute to the worldwide expansion of worker protection from labor exploitation.

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KalamazooCentralDelegates 11/22/2023 10:46:29 24.180.108.88

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: United States of America
Delegate Name: Kate Risley

Despite an official worldwide end to slavery in 1981 with Mauritania banning the legal recognition of ownership of individuals, the UN estimates that over 40 million people worldwide are still trapped in contemporary forms of slavery. The United Nations also indicates that the causes of this high rate of contemporary slavery range from poverty and unemployment to weak enforcement of laws. The United States recognizes the issue of worker exploitation worldwide and hopes to work towards a solution that helps the most vulnerable populations subjected to exploitation in the workforce and “modern day slavery”.

The US has implemented laws against discrimination and unsafe conditions in the workforce, and urges other countries to do the same. The United States is willing to provide any help, financial or otherwise, to help other countries enforce laws surrounding working conditions. The underlying causes of worker exploitation should also be investigated. COVID-19, natural disasters, poverty, and lack of job availability are just a few possible causes of worker exploitation that should be focused on in any effort to solve the problem.

The United States recognizes that worker exploitation is a broad issue and therefore cannot be solved in a short conference. Therefore, it is necessary that nations cooperate with each other and find specific issues within the topic of worker exploitation to focus on. The US is willing to focus on the issues that countries dealing with the most worker exploitation believe are the most prevalent.

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Kaycee Duffey 11/21/2023 22:12:14 68.43.9.246

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Argentina
Delegate Name: Eva Gavin

Committee: UN Development Program
Topic: Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Kingdom of Argentina
Delegate: Eva Gavin, Forest Hills Northern High School

Argentina sees safeguarding employees against labor exploitation as an essential human right and a key component of sustainable growth, we understand how important this is. Since the problem transcends national boundaries, worldwide cooperation is required to develop and implement workable solutions. Argentina is persistent in its commitment to promoting just and fair working conditions, protecting workers’ dignity, and collaborating with others to address the worldwide issues brought on by labor exploitation.

Our country has a long history of defending workers’ rights and putting laws in place that keep them safe from exploitation. The nation has continuously modified its institutional and legislative frameworks to guarantee fair pay, suitable work hours, and safe working conditions for employees, dating back to historic labor struggles. Despite these initiatives, problems still exist, mainly with regard to migrant worker treatment and unregulated labor markets.

Argentina supports the UN’s efforts to combat worker exploitation, as demonstrated by the numerous resolutions and proclamations made within the UN Development Program. Argentina, which emphasizes the need for extensive solutions, is in favor of current UN initiatives that advance social discourse, strengthen legal frameworks, and improve international collaboration in the fight against labor exploitation.

Argentina advocates that in order to find and close the flaws in worker protection, a thorough analysis of both domestic and international labor laws be conducted. This involves taking specific measures to combat child labor, forced labor, and employment discrimination. Argentina supports the promotion of inclusive and transparent communication at the national and international levels between employers, employees, and governments. The result of this discussion needs to be the creation of workable laws and methods for stopping and dealing with labor exploitation. Argentina supports national and international capacity building projects because we understand the value of empowered enforcement. To improve their capacity to identify and address instances of labor exploitation, law enforcement, labor inspectors, and businesses must get training. Argentina urges that nations, non-governmental groups, and international organizations work together more closely. The main goals of this cooperative endeavor should be to exchange information, share efficient methods, and create a coordinated strategy to stop labor exploitation everywhere. Argentina is adamant in its determination to work together with the UN Development Program in order to confront the issues of labor exploitation and defend workers’ rights across the globe. Argentina hopes to make a major contribution to the ongoing global efforts to promote a fair and equitable working environment for all by building on past successes, aligning with UN stances, and advocating for concrete actions to be taken.

Works Cited:
Legal Team Argentina. “Employment Law in Argentina: A Guide.” Biz Latin Hub, 18 Jan. 2022, www.bizlatinhub.com/employment-law-argentina/.

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WilliamstonDelegates 11/21/2023 23:24:29 172.58.126.85

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Ghana
Delegate Name: Frinz Fisher

Committee: ECOSOC
Topic: Worker Protection from Labor Exploitation
Country: Ghana
Delegate: Frinz Fisher

Labor exploitation is, as described by the United Nations Global Impact, the forced or compulsory labor is any work or service that is exacted from any person under the menace of any penalty, and for which that person has not offered himself or herself voluntarily. Labor exploitation has been inevitably on the rise due to unprecedented events that has caused labor to become a priority to satisfy the needs of consumers. In addition, labor exploitation is reliant on the labor of people alike to cheaply accommodate these needs, without the justification of cheap labor, prices of products, services, and more would be excruciatingly increased. However, these poor conditions have caused the physical, psychological, emotional, and financial strain on the laborers. Overall, the exploitation of labor creates a toxic economy reliant on the cruel mistreatment of those across the globe, it is our responsibility as the United Nations to find a solution.

The nation of Ghana has unfortunately been an example of these cruel mistreatments. Trafficking has been a leading example, with about 30 percent of children ranging from the ages of 5-17 years engaging in the labors of inland and coastal fishing, domestic service, street hawking, begging, portering, artisanal gold mining, and other forced labor systems. Additionally, about 20 percent of these children happen to work in hostile and unsafe conditions. Ghana has made present and recent attempts to confront these actions as Ghana Parliament having ratified The Childrens’ Act as well as providing standard hours of working per day via the Ghana Labor Law, unfortunately Ghana has the inability to fully combat these injustices due to the lack of enforcement and this coincides within the economy as well. Ghana is presently in one of the worst economic positions, with last year’s inflation rates rising up to over 50 percent. These unprecedented rates have caused citizens to provide through loans which puts the Ghanaian economy into further plunge.

Therefore, Ghana supports the expansion and rise of development of better working facilities and well as international regulations of labor work. Ghana wishes to create and support equal rights of labor to combat any detrimental effects of physical, mental, emotion, and financial burden. Proposing any service to help those that have been a part of these cruel mistreatments, as well as compensating through communicative action to find reasonable trials of creating a protection plan. Ghana wishes to work with the United States of America, Belgium, and China to find a comfortable solution to fit the standard, proposing an example to surrounding nations.

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KalamazooCentralDelegates 11/21/2023 19:13:12 138.43.90.123

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Nigeria
Delegate Name: Keegan Bierema

Labor exploitation is when an employer takes advantage of a worker in a desperate or vulnerable situation in order to give little or no pay. Labor exploitation goes beyond that definition and includes all forms of exploitation for labor or servitude. While the adoption of Sustainable Development Goals by the international community promises to eradicate forced child labor by 2030, the world is nowhere close. Modern conflicts, Covid-19, and other situations provide even more opportunity for exploitation. With an increase of about 10 million people since the last estimate, a dire solution is needed to stifle the market for labor exploitation.
Nigerian labor exploitation was very high before the year 2000. Nigeria has committed itself to the end of forced labor since the 2004 Labour Act. Nigeria’s labor exploitation mostly happens in small pockets of mining for the country’s rich natural resources. Nigeria has made advancements on the annihilation of labor exploitation and child labor by conducting over 17,000 labor inspections and creating 11 new child labor monitoring committees. In the last 20 years, Nigeria has established all the legal framework to work internationally for an end to labor exploitation.
Nigeria would like to see an end to Labor exploitation in the World and in Africa. The country hopes that the international community acknowledges the efforts of a newer country to enact change in its continent regarding labor exploitation. Most importantly, the Republic of Nigeria hopes to work on this issue and reaches agreements that are beneficial for west African countries as a whole. The Republic of Nigeria is excited to work with global and regional partners to come to a consensus on the issue.

Works cited
https://www.walkfree.org/reports/global-estimates-of-modern-slavery-2022/#:~:text=Forced%20Labour%20and%20Forced%20Marriage&text=Forced%20labour%20accounts%20for%2027.6,150%20people%20in%20the%20world.
https://www.dol.gov/agencies/ilab/resources/reports/child-labor/nigeria
https://www.ilo.org/dyn/natlex/docs/WEBTEXT/42156/64980/E7RNGA01.htm

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RoyalOakDelegate 11/21/2023 17:52:00 75.204.241.59

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Venezuela
Delegate Name: Ethan Robine

Country: Venezuela
Committee: UNDP
Topic: Labor Exploitation

Throughout the world nations are in economic turmoil. Unprecedented stress as a result of issues such as the Covid-19 pandemic and increasing climate change related disasters, have caused hyperinflation, labor shortages, and unsafe working conditions across the globe. Labor exploitation has inevitably arisen in recent years in large part due to the aforementioned issues. It is the desperation of extreme economic hardship that allows the manipulation of basic human rights and facilitates the implementation of labor exploitation at a large scale. However the exploitation of workers is in the long run unproductive, it does not lead to the development of a sustainable and flourishing economy, but rather the detriment of the market and the people of the country within which it occurs.

The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela is familiar with the challenges that come with economic hardship. The nation is currently experiencing the hardest economic crisis in its history. Several years of budget deficits, declining oil revenue, and extreme hyperinflation has placed Venezuela in an extremely dire economic situation, only made worse by the loss of laborers to large scale emigration. Thus the nation is understanding regarding the motivation behind the exploitation of workers. Venezuela continues to endure, and as a result understands, hardship and sympathizes with those who turn to less than ideal working conditions. In many instances a child may need to work in order to earn his family money to help purchase food, or perhaps a man in desperation must take a second job, regardless of the wage. This issue is incredibly difficult and varies by nation, thus Venezuela firmly believes that it is not at the international, but rather the national level that this topic should be addressed.

While Venezuela is understanding of the theoretical motivation behind labor exploitation, the nation would, ofcourse, never condone the practical implementation of such actions. Venezuela has long publicly spoken against labor exploitation practices, over the years ratifying several international conventions on relevant topics (ILO C. 138, ILO C. 182, UN CRC). These ratifications coming from the International Labor Organization and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child outline the minimum ages laborers must be, acknowledge the issue of horrific forms of child labor and cover the rights of children. Additionally at the domestic level Venezuela has passed numerous legislation helping to prevent the exploitation of workers. Within Article 32 of the nation’s labor law, a minimum age of labor was set at 14, a reasonable value mirroring that of many nations such as the United States. Additional legislation sets the minimum age for hazardous work at 18, and prohibits children from working in hazardous occupations (Article 96, of the Law for the Protection of Children and Adolescents). Furthermore Article 30 of the Labor Law prohibits forced labor. It is clear that through the ratification of international conventions and the passing of numerous legislation that the nation of Venezuela is firmly against the exploitation of laborers.

There is no denying that labor exploitation is a difficult issue. It is so pervasive throughout the globe, and its motivation can be traced back to a wide variety of reasons. Many nations undergoing extreme economic crises often rely on the exploitation of workers to keep their drowning economies afloat. Thus we must consider, how we can ensure that nations who rely on these cruel practices do not undergo catastrophic economic collapse as a result of their removal? The very core of this issue is personal and individualized to each nation, it is clear that there is no universal fix. One country’s solution may only exacerbate the issue in another, thus it is imperative that we allow resolutions to be carried out at the domestic level. The UN should respect the sovereignty of each individual nation. Each state government should be given the freedom to draft a solution catered to their specific circumstance. It is clearly vital that all nations work independently in order to put an end to the exploitation of laborers, as in the long run this issue is economically harmful and unsustainable.

Works Cited:

“Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor – Venezuela.” DOL, www.dol.gov/agencies/ilab/resources/reports/child-labor/venezuela. Accessed 21 Nov. 2023.

“Venezuela: The Rise and Fall of a Petrostate.” Council on Foreign Relations, www.cfr.org/backgrounder/venezuela-crisis. Accessed 21 Nov. 2023.

Ramirez, Carlos Eduardo, and Vivian Sequera. “Pandemic’s Hard Realities Worsen Venezuelan Child Labor Crisis.” Reuters, Thomson Reuters, 10 May 2021, www.reuters.com/article/us-venezuela-children/pandemics-hard-realities-worsen-venezuelan-child-labor-crisis-idUSKBN2CR1LX/. Accessed 21 Nov. 2023.

Reid, Kathryn. “Venezuela Crisis: Facts, FAQs, and How to Help.” World Vision, 21 Sept. 2023, www.worldvision.org/disaster-relief-news-stories/venezuela-crisis-facts. Accessed 21 Nov. 2023.

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WilliamstonDelegates 11/21/2023 15:33:28 136.228.39.189

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: China
Delegate Name: Riley Chandel

Delegate: Riley Chandel
School: Williamston High School
Country: China
Committee: UNDP
Topic: Worker Protection from Labor Exploitation

Labor exploitation is a major issue in the current day with many poverty-stricken individuals being forced to work long hours for minimal pay. The other issue involves slavery where individuals are forced to work for no pay, resulting in even more poverty. Statistics show that around 50 million individuals are forced to go into slavery in the modern day. The issue of labor exploitation was recognized when the Treaty of Versailles created the International Labor Organization, an organization meant to monitor any exploitations of citizens and provide social and economic justice.

China has made improvements in its labor exploitation, by making slavery diminish in the country and increasing the minimum wage of workers. China is mainly combating the usage of exploited labor by using A.I technology to replace mistreated workers. A.I have been installed in areas such as factories to end the exploitation of factory workers. Though China’s economy depends on cheaper labor for exporting, the country is still putting in measures such as increasing worker pay to aid in giving workers a better life, with Shang-Hai receiving a wage increase, also having the highest minimum wage in the country.

China would like to propose that countries begin to integrate more A.I technology into lowering the exploitation of workers. China recognizes that not every country will be able to do this and does not wish to interfere with other nation’s sovereignty. China also believes that creating new laws to lower slavery in nations would also be beneficial to the cause of lowering worker exploitation. China would like to address that it will be difficult to implement major changes as the country greatly depends on cheaper labor for its economy and feels too much change will create issues with exportation. China hopes to find allies with the countries of the Russian Federation, Vietnam, and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

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WilliamstonDelegates 11/21/2023 15:27:15 136.228.39.189

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Belgium
Delegate Name: Abby Grocki

Exploitation is defined as the unfair treatment of an individual or resource for the benefit of the work they provide. In the modern workplace around the globe the UN has observed employers treating workers like objects just as described. Labor exploitation entails numerous negative results including poor wages for overworked employees, hazardous conditions, and just overall lack of respect. With approximately 50 million individuals currently subjected to forced labor, the UNDP must observe and regulate the sources of labor exploitation for the protection of the people.

Belgium sets a fine example of excellent working conditions as the Belgian workers are reported to be highly ranked for worlds happiest workforce. While Belgians economy is able to support the work-life balance that Europeans cherish dearly, it may not be the case for other nations. Belgium does not wish to impede on the national sovereignty of any other nation, and would like to promote suggestions that have led to a productive working state. The global employment percentage is 56%; Belgium has 64% of the total population employed and offers numerous benefits that attract workers. Employers’ taxes may range anywhere from 25% to 30.43% of employees wages while employees set aside 13.07% of paychecks for the government to fund pensions, unemployment benefits, workplace injury insurance, and illness benefits. With a legal working week of 38 hours, many Belgians believe in a balance of work and life so there is time for family, travel, and other important events during time off. With paid time off, workers are able to be recharged so it is a peaceful and healthy work environment that eliminates stress and disrespect. Social consultation is also used in Belgian employment policy where employers and workers consult the protection offered. In addition, Belgium ratified the Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, 1930 in September of 2019 to combat labor exploitation and use preventative and rehabilitative measures for the betterment of the people.

Belgium supports the movement of opening availability of jobs in which are safe, inclusive, and beneficial for the wellbeing of each individual in the workforce. Belgium proposes safety and rehabilitation centers to compensate victims of labor exploitation for a safer protection plan. Belgium looks forward to working with the U.S., Netherlands, Germany, and France to encourage the protection of workers and eliminate labor exploitation.

Works Cited
“Belgium Joins Efforts to Combat Forced Labour.” Forced Labour: Belgium Joins Efforts to Combat Forced Labour, 10 Sept. 2019, www.ilo.org/global/standards/subjects-covered-by-international-labour-standards/forced-labour/WCMS_718149/lang–en/index.htm.
Dyvik, Einar H. “Global Employment Rate by Region 2023.” Statista, 1 Nov. 2023, www.statista.com/statistics/1258882/global-employment-rate-by-region/.
“Employment Legislation.” Employment Legislation | Belgium.Be, .be, 2023, www.belgium.be/en/work/employment_legislation.
Gilbert, Bruce. “Employee Benefits in Belgium: All You Need to Know.” Blog, remote.com/blog/belgium-employee-benefits-compensation. Accessed 21 Nov. 2023.
“P029 – Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, 1930.” Protocol P029 – Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, 1930, www.ilo.org/dyn/normlex/en/f?p=NORMLEXPUB%3A12100%3A0%3A%3ANO%3A%3AP12100_ILO_CODE%3AP029. Accessed 21 Nov. 2023.

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RoyalOakDelegate 11/21/2023 12:21:32 216.11.121.174

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Ethiopia
Delegate Name: Kathryn Macey

11/18/23
Submitted to: United Nations Development Programme
From: Ethiopia
Subject: Worker Protection from Labor Exploitation

Millions of people worldwide are the victims of labor exploitation. Various types of labor exploitation are present throughout the world, such as dangerous or unsanitary working conditions, under-compensation for work, child labor, labor trafficking, and other types of forced labor. Ethiopia encourages this body to mirror our commitment to addressing the root causes of labor exploitation within Ethiopia and around the world.

Exploitative labor practices are prevalent in Ethiopia. Forced labor and commercial sexual exploitation are prevalent as a result of human trafficking. Long-term droughts have created food instability and internal displacement. Internally displaced children are more susceptible to being forced into child labor and exploited. It’s estimated that approximately 15 million children work in Ethiopia. Most of those children work in the agriculture sector, the weaving industry, or domestic service. The government of Ethiopia has recognized labor exploitation occurring in Ethiopia and in an effort to prevent it in the future supported a study in 2022 that investigated the causes behind child domestic servitude.

With the underlying factors contributing to labor exploitation revealed, the problem can be addressed more effectively. Different countries have various contributing factors contributing to the existence of labor exploitation, however, Ethiopia would like to stress that this body should focus on the root cause. Labor exploitation occurs when there is a substantial power imbalance. Companies chasing low production costs in developing nations underpay for the resources, allowing practices such as child labor and forced labor. Desperate families in poverty sometimes have little choice but to pursue opportunities that this body would classify as labor exploitation. Traffickers search for vulnerable people to exploit.

The biggest factors in creating these power imbalances are poverty and economic inequality. A United Nations Development Programme survey in 2019 found that 68.7 percent of people in Ethiopia are in multidimensional poverty. These conditions offer an explanation for the labor exploitation that occurs in Ethiopia. Countries with widespread poverty often have higher rates of labor exploitation.

The United Nations established the Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery in 1991 with the goal of providing both financial and other assistance to victims of labor exploitation. Ethiopia strongly encourages the international community to contribute to this fund so that the benefits it provides can be expanded among a greater number of victims. But these approaches, while essential, are not enough. The investment has to come to people before they are victims. An additional fund needs to be created to help impoverished people in areas with high levels of labor exploitation. It is the duty of wealthier countries to contribute to prevent the inhumane exploitation of workers across the globe.

Ethiopia appreciates the number of nations who are coming together to address this problem. As a country with high levels of poverty and labor exploitation, Ethiopia wants to ensure that the root causes are addressed in order to prevent this issue from growing. Ethiopia looks forward to collaborating with other nations on potential solutions.

Bibliography:

“The United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery.” OHCHR, https://www.ohchr.org/en/about-us/funding-and-budget/trust-funds/united-nations-voluntary-trust-fund-contemporary-forms-slavery. Accessed 19 Nov. 2023.

Shrestha, Som Kumar. Briefing Note for Countries on the 2023 Multidimensional Poverty Index. 2023.

“A Deep Dive into the Labor Exploitation Behind Everyday Products.” DOL Blog, https://blog.dol.gov/2022/09/28/a-deep-dive-into-the-labor-exploitation-behind-everyday-products. Accessed 19 Nov. 2023.

“Ethiopians Fighting Against Child Exploitation (E-FACE).” DOL, https://www.dol.gov/agencies/ilab/ethiopians-fighting-against-child-exploitation-e-face#:~:text=Many%20children%20involved%20in%20this,farming%20land%20and%20HIV%2FAIDS. Accessed 19 Nov. 2023.

“Labor Trafficking.” National Human Trafficking Hotline, https://humantraffickinghotline.org/en/human-trafficking/labor-trafficking#:~:text=Common%20types%20of%20labor%20trafficking,with%20little%20to%20no%20pay. Accessed 19 Nov. 2023.

“Drought In Ethiopia: 10 Million People In Need.” Africa Renewal, 9 Feb. 2016, https://www.un.org/africarenewal/news/drought-ethiopia-10-million-people-need#:~:text=Humanitarian%20needs%20in%20Ethiopia%20have,failures%20and%20widespread%20livestock%20deaths. Accessed 19 Nov. 2023.

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EastGrandRapidsDelegates 11/20/2023 17:40:56 68.32.206.49

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Russian Federation
Delegate Name: Audrey Krajewski

United Nations Development Programme
Worker Protection from Exploitation
The Russian Federation
Audrey Krajewski

The Russian Federation is committed to promoting and protecting the rights of workers within our borders. As a nation that values the contributions of all our citizens to create a world class labour force, it is of the utmost importance to The Russian Federation that we are fostering a work environment that prioritises the well being of our economy and citizens. The Russian Federation is an inspirational example of valuing our world renowned economy and our people.
The Russian Federation has an extensive and comprehensive background of legal framework in place to safeguard our Russia citizens workers’ rights. The Labour Code of the Russian Federation establishes the fundamental principles for labour relations in Russia, ensuring fair working hours and conditions, in addition to fair wages. The Labour Code of the Russian Federation explicitly calls out and prohibits discrimination, child labour, and forced labour, reflecting our commitment to eradicating exploitative labour practices (“Labor Code…”). Furthermore, according to a publication from the International Labour Organisation, the Russian Federation has publicly denounced “slave labour” as modern evil which must be eradicated worldwide (“Labor Code…”). Slavery of any kind has been illegal in Russia since the 1720s (“The Criminal Code…”). Moreover, Article 127 of the Russian Criminal Code prohibits both trafficking for commercial sexual exploitation and forced labour (“The Criminal Code…”). Well often discredited, it is indisputable that the Russian Federation has made concrete steps in establishing a progressive labour market with extensive benefits for the worker. In addition, to address issues related to informal employment and ensure that all workers are protected, the Russian Federation has implemented measures to streamline administrative procedures for businesses and workers, making it easier for employers to comply with legal obligations established by the Labour Code of the Russian Federation as well as the Russian Criminal Code. Furthermore, The Russian Federation finds that this way it is easier for employees to access their rights spelled out by either document.
Well the Russian Federation acknowledges the allegations that the war with Ukraine has increased the potential for slave and child labour, The Russian Federation assures that any increase in human trafficking within the Ukrainian borders is a result of mismanagement by the Ukrainian government (“Russian Invasion in Ukraine…”). The Russian Federation has seen how important establishing protection of workers rights can help to grow your economy ethically. Russia, as the 10th largest economy in the world, has established a balance of economic progress as well as worker protection from exploitation that The Russian Federation believes countries worldwide should adopt. The Russian Federation is excited to work with our allies Belarus, China, India, Iran, North Korea, Kazakhstan and Syria, and the eternity of the United Nations Development Programme to end worker exploitation.

Work Cited
Ilo Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights , www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_norm/—declaration/documents/normativeinstrument/wcms_716594.pdf. Accessed 18 Nov. 2023.
“Labor Code of the Russian Federation.” Russian Federation. Labor Code of the Russian Federation of 31 December 2001, www.ilo.org/dyn/natlex/docs/WEBTEXT/60535/65252/E01RUS01.htm. Accessed 18 Nov. 2023.
“Russian Invasion in Ukraine Leads to Increased Risks of Human Trafficking – IOM in Ukraine.” United Nations, United Nations, ukraine.un.org/en/175247-russian-invasion-ukraine-leads-increased-risks-human-trafficking-%E2%80%93-iom. Accessed 18 Nov. 2023.
“The Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.” The Criminal Code of the Russian Federation No. 63-FZ of June 13, 1996, wipolex-res.wipo.int/edocs/lexdocs/laws/en/ru/ru080en.html. Accessed 18 Nov. 2023.

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EastGrandRapidsDelegates 11/18/2023 10:58:36 64.85.150.181

Topic: 2023-Worker Protection From Labor Exploitation
Country: Russian Federation
Delegate Name: Audrey Krajewski

United Nations Development Programme
Worker Protection from Exploitation
The Russian Federation
Audrey Krajewski

The Russian Federation is committed to promoting and protecting the rights of workers within our borders. As a nation that values the contributions of all our citizens to create a world class labour force, it is of the utmost importance to The Russian Federation that we are fostering a work environment that prioritises the well being of our economy and citizens. The Russian Federation is an inspirational example of valuing our world renowned economy and our people.
The Russian Federation has an extensive and comprehensive background of legal framework in place to safeguard our Russia citizens workers’ rights. The Labour Code of the Russian Federation establishes the fundamental principles for labour relations in Russia, ensuring fair working hours and conditions, in addition to fair wages. The Labour Code of the Russian Federation explicitly calls out and prohibits discrimination, child labour, and forced labour, reflecting our commitment to eradicating exploitative labour practices (“Labor Code…”). Furthermore, according to a publication from the International Labour Organisation, the Russian Federation has publicly denounced “slave labour” as modern evil which must be eradicated worldwide (“Labor Code…”). Slavery of any kind has been illegal in Russia since the 1720s (“The Criminal Code…”). Moreover, Article 127 of the Russian Criminal Code prohibits both trafficking for commercial sexual exploitation and forced labour (“The Criminal Code…”). Well often discredited, it is indisputable that the Russian Federation has made concrete steps in establishing a progressive labour market with extensive benefits for the worker. In addition, to address issues related to informal employment and ensure that all workers are protected, the Russian Federation has implemented measures to streamline administrative procedures for businesses and workers, making it easier for employers to comply with legal obligations established by the Labour Code of the Russian Federation as well as the Russian Criminal Code. Furthermore, The Russian Federation finds that this way it is easier for employees to access their rights spelled out by either document.
Well the Russian Federation acknowledges the allegations that the war with Ukraine has increased the potential for slave and child labour, The Russian Federation assures that any increase in human trafficking within the Ukrainian borders is a result of mismanagement by the Ukrainian government (“Russian Invasion in Ukraine…”). The Russian Federation has seen how important establishing protection of workers rights can help to grow your economy ethically. Russia, as the 10th largest economy in the world, has established a balance of economic progress as well as worker protection from exploitation that The Russian Federation believes countries worldwide should adopt. The Russian Federation is excited to work with our allies Belarus, China, India, Iran, North Korea, Kazakhstan and Syria, and the eternity of the United Nations Development Programme to end worker exploitation.

Work Cited
Ilo Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights , www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_norm/—declaration/documents/normativeinstrument/wcms_716594.pdf. Accessed 18 Nov. 2023.
“Labor Code of the Russian Federation.” Russian Federation. Labor Code of the Russian Federation of 31 December 2001, www.ilo.org/dyn/natlex/docs/WEBTEXT/60535/65252/E01RUS01.htm. Accessed 18 Nov. 2023.
“Russian Invasion in Ukraine Leads to Increased Risks of Human Trafficking – IOM in Ukraine.” United Nations, United Nations, ukraine.un.org/en/175247-russian-invasion-ukraine-leads-increased-risks-human-trafficking-%E2%80%93-iom. Accessed 18 Nov. 2023.
“The Criminal Code of the Russian Federation.” The Criminal Code of the Russian Federation No. 63-FZ of June 13, 1996, wipolex-res.wipo.int/edocs/lexdocs/laws/en/ru/ru080en.html. Accessed 18 Nov. 2023.

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