September 16, 2019
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 In GLICA2019: Preventing the Illicit Arms Trade

The illicit arms trade exists as one of the monumental issues in the world today.  Most of these being small arms or light weapons, SA/LW, account for 60%-90% of conflict deaths every year.  Because these weapons are legalized in many military situations among most countries, control of output of these weapons illicitly can be difficult to procure.  These are very easily stolen, and are small enough to be smuggled in articles of clothing, food items, and small vehicles. As these weapons are constantly being seized by major terrorist groups and militants, projection against civilians has become extremely dangerous.  In this modern world, one gunman can often kill scores and scores of innocent people. As such, this issue must be dealt with, for the protection of defenseless people everywhere.  

We, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, see this matter as a great threat of not only domestic security, but world sanctity.  We see it best that fewer small arms should exist and production should have moderated limits. The circulation of these weapons is clearly the real problem at hand here, thus some sort of reduction in the flow of weapons is absolutely essential in order to additionally void chances of illicit trading.  In ordinance with the European Union, we share similar inclinations on how the issue stands with us. Nations need to develop their own weapons, so fewer unqualified groups and individuals can take control of these large caches of dangerous equipment.

 

In order to stop the trade, production must see a dramatic decrease, which calls upon responsibility from the major developed nations: this includes the United States, France, China, India, Russia, Japan, and others.  If these nations expect violence to decrease, and deaths to be limited, they must expect to limit their own trade and production. Additionally, weapons cannot be stockpiled; that is, that once attained, small arms must be destroyed immediately. 

  • United Kingdom
  • Mason Oudekerk

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