September 16, 2019
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 In GLIMUN2019: Renewable Energy

Topic: Renewable Energy 

Nation: Japan 

Committee: ECOSOC

Renewable Energy is a topic widely discussed in the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), and is a growing necessity internationally. The use of energy is a fundamental part of everyday life for billions of people worldwide, and while millions of people do not have access to energy, the burden the generation of energy has on the environment must be considered. The daily use of energy in many nations intensifies the obligation to find renewable ways to harness energy. Renewable energy is becoming increasingly necessary as climate change continues to worsen. Renewable energy will prove to be as effective, if not more effective than other methods of harnessing energy; as the costs of renewable energy sources has rapidly declined in many nations around the world, and have become competitive with fossil fuels. Renewable energy is not only comparable to fossil fuels in cost, but in power and profitability as well.  As of 2015, approximately 23% of international electricity was generated from renewable sources, and it is projected that 31% will come from renewable sources by 2040 (The U.S Energy Information Administration). The United Nations (specifically ECOSOC) has shown its dedication to the topic of Renewable Energy in the “Sustainable Development Goals”, goal 7, “Affordable and Clean Energy”. ECOSOC also formed the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in 2015. IRENA works to transform renewable energy as a center for knowledge and innovation, and has 160 members as of 2019, including Japan. 

Japan is a top market for all renewable energy products globally. The delegation is ranked 2nd in the world by the Department of Commerce for having renewable energy opportunities. Japan currently produces 10% of its energy from renewable resources, but we hope to increase that to 25% by 2030. Japan is in support of the development of renewable energy sources, as it would benefit considerably from renewable energy not only because it will significantly reduce the carbon footprint of the nation, but it will be cost beneficial, as Japan heavily depends on fossil fuels, coals, oils, and natural gases that have been imported. In 2012, Japan implemented the Feed-in Tariff system (FIT), to promote renewable energy development, and has resulted in a steady increase of energy generation from renewable sources. Similarly, the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI) was also formed to enforce laws and regulations based around renewable energy, and implementing the FIT system in Japan. Additionally in 2016, Japan the Port and Harbor Law was enacted to push for the use of coastline winds as a way to generate energy. Japan is also home to 73 of the world’s largest floating solar plants, as a way to harness the power from the sun.Japan recognizes that the oil industry is a large part of the economy in many nations; however, it is worth noting that over 6.5 million people internationally were employed by renewable technology in 2013. 

Renewable energy is beneficial to all nations, as all nations are susceptible to falling in the face of climate change. The delegation of Japan believes that in order to address the necessary international use of renewable energy, we, as an international community must first recognize the severity of the climate crisis at hand, and realize that immediate action must be taken. Second, we must be willing to share new renewable energy technology and resources with each other, with the end goal being to increase the overall use of renewable energy. Third, Japan believes that coastal nations with high levels of offshore winds must install wind turbines to harness wind power. Similarly, Japan believes that coastal nations should install offshore solar power plants, with similar structures to that of Japan’s offshore plant in Kagoshima Bay. Renewable energy is something that every nation can benefit from, which is why the Delegation of Japan is looking forward to collaborating with other nations to reach a consensus regarding possible solutions to increase the use of renewable energy,  and increase general access to energy. 







Topic: Renewable Energy 

Nation: Japan 

Committee: ECOSOC

Renewable Energy is a topic widely discussed in the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), and is a growing necessity internationally. The use of energy is a fundamental part of everyday life for billions of people worldwide, and while millions of people do not have access to energy, the burden the generation of energy has on the environment must be considered. The daily use of energy in many nations intensifies the obligation to find renewable ways to harness energy. Renewable energy is becoming increasingly necessary as climate change continues to worsen. Renewable energy will prove to be as effective, if not more effective than other methods of harnessing energy; as the costs of renewable energy sources has rapidly declined in many nations around the world, and have become competitive with fossil fuels. Renewable energy is not only comparable to fossil fuels in cost, but in power and profitability as well.  As of 2015, approximately 23% of international electricity was generated from renewable sources, and it is projected that 31% will come from renewable sources by 2040 (The U.S Energy Information Administration). The United Nations (specifically ECOSOC) has shown its dedication to the topic of Renewable Energy in the “Sustainable Development Goals”, goal 7, “Affordable and Clean Energy”. ECOSOC also formed the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in 2015. IRENA works to transform renewable energy as a center for knowledge and innovation, and has 160 members as of 2019, including Japan. 

Japan is a top market for all renewable energy products globally. The delegation is ranked 2nd in the world by the Department of Commerce for having renewable energy opportunities. Japan currently produces 10% of its energy from renewable resources, but we hope to increase that to 25% by 2030. Japan is in support of the development of renewable energy sources, as it would benefit considerably from renewable energy not only because it will significantly reduce the carbon footprint of the nation, but it will be cost beneficial, as Japan heavily depends on fossil fuels, coals, oils, and natural gases that have been imported. In 2012, Japan implemented the Feed-in Tariff system (FIT), to promote renewable energy development, and has resulted in a steady increase of energy generation from renewable sources. Similarly, the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI) was also formed to enforce laws and regulations based around renewable energy, and implementing the FIT system in Japan. Additionally in 2016, Japan the Port and Harbor Law was enacted to push for the use of coastline winds as a way to generate energy. Japan is also home to 73 of the world’s largest floating solar plants, as a way to harness the power from the sun.Japan recognizes that the oil industry is a large part of the economy in many nations; however, it is worth noting that over 6.5 million people internationally were employed by renewable technology in 2013. 

Renewable energy is beneficial to all nations, as all nations are susceptible to falling in the face of climate change. The delegation of Japan believes that in order to address the necessary international use of renewable energy, we, as an international community must first recognize the severity of the climate crisis at hand, and realize that immediate action must be taken. Second, we must be willing to share new renewable energy technology and resources with each other, with the end goal being to increase the overall use of renewable energy. Third, Japan believes that coastal nations with high levels of offshore winds must install wind turbines to harness wind power. Similarly, Japan believes that coastal nations should install offshore solar power plants, with similar structures to that of Japan’s offshore plant in Kagoshima Bay. Renewable energy is something that every nation can benefit from, which is why the Delegation of Japan is looking forward to collaborating with other nations to reach a consensus regarding possible solutions to increase the use of renewable energy,  and increase general access to Topic: Renewable Energy 

Nation: Japan 

Committee: ECOSOC

Renewable Energy is a topic widely discussed in the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), and is a growing necessity internationally. The use of energy is a fundamental part of everyday life for billions of people worldwide, and while millions of people do not have access to energy, the burden the generation of energy has on the environment must be considered. The daily use of energy in many nations intensifies the obligation to find renewable ways to harness energy. Renewable energy is becoming increasingly necessary as climate change continues to worsen. Renewable energy will prove to be as effective, if not more effective than other methods of harnessing energy; as the costs of renewable energy sources has rapidly declined in many nations around the world, and have become competitive with fossil fuels. Renewable energy is not only comparable to fossil fuels in cost, but in power and profitability as well.  As of 2015, approximately 23% of international electricity was generated from renewable sources, and it is projected that 31% will come from renewable sources by 2040 (The U.S Energy Information Administration). The United Nations (specifically ECOSOC) has shown its dedication to the topic of Renewable Energy in the “Sustainable Development Goals”, goal 7, “Affordable and Clean Energy”. ECOSOC also formed the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in 2015. IRENA works to transform renewable energy as a center for knowledge and innovation, and has 160 members as of 2019, including Japan. 

Japan is a top market for all renewable energy products globally. The delegation is ranked 2nd in the world by the Department of Commerce for having renewable energy opportunities. Japan currently produces 10% of its energy from renewable resources, but we hope to increase that to 25% by 2030. Japan is in support of the development of renewable energy sources, as it would benefit considerably from renewable energy not only because it will significantly reduce the carbon footprint of the nation, but it will be cost beneficial, as Japan heavily depends on fossil fuels, coals, oils, and natural gases that have been imported. In 2012, Japan implemented the Feed-in Tariff system (FIT), to promote renewable energy development, and has resulted in a steady increase of energy generation from renewable sources. Similarly, the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI) was also formed to enforce laws and regulations based around renewable energy, and implementing the FIT system in Japan. Additionally in 2016, Japan the Port and Harbor Law was enacted to push for the use of coastline winds as a way to generate energy. Japan is also home to 73 of the world’s largest floating solar plants, as a way to harness the power from the sun.Japan recognizes that the oil industry is a large part of the economy in many nations; however, it is worth noting that over 6.5 million people internationally were employed by renewable technology in 2013. 

Renewable energy is beneficial to all nations, as all nations are susceptible to falling in the face of climate change. The delegation of Japan believes that in order to address the necessary international use of renewable energy, we, as an international community must first recognize the severity of the climate crisis at hand, and realize that immediate action must be taken. Second, we must be willing to share new renewable energy technology and resources with each other, with the end goal being to increase the overall use of renewable energy. Third, Japan believes that coastal nations with high levels of offshore winds must install wind turbines to harness wind power. Similarly, Japan believes that coastal nations should install offshore solar power plants, with similar structures to that of Japan’s offshore plant in Kagoshima Bay. Renewable energy is something that every nation can benefit from, which is why the Delegation of Japan is looking forward to collaborating with other nations to reach a consensus regarding possible solutions to increase the use of renewable energy,  and increase general access to energy globally.

  • Sydney Levy

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