September 16, 2019
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Renewable Energy

ECOSOC: Environmental

Topic: Renewable Energy

Reliable access to energy is a fundamental part of daily life for billions of people around the world; however, today there are still almost one billion people who lack access to functioning electricity, half of whom can be found in sub-Saharan Africa alone. While increasing energy access is in and of itself an important issue, increasing the proportion of electricity generated from renewable energy sources is a growing concern in the face of climate change. Rapidly declining costs of renewable energy in the past decade have resulted in wind and solar becoming cost competitive with fossil fuels in many regions across the globe. In seeking to expand energy access, it is essential that we consider the future and the impact that energy generation has on the planet. The United Nations has shown its commitment to this mission by establishing “Affordable and Clean Energy” as the seventh of its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set out in 2015.

The 2016 Paris Agreement marked transitioning to renewable energy as a crucial step towards meeting the Paris climate goals, as reliance on fossil fuels has widely been recognized as one of the largest contributing factors to climate change. The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has itself been a major proponent of energy solutions that integrate climate and development benefits, establishing an approach that focuses on zero-carbon, risk-informed, sustainable development in order to achieve climate targets and reduce disaster risk. The UNDP acknowledges both on and off-grid renewable solutions as key to expanding renewable energy penetration, encouraging governments to transform their renewable energy markets by strengthening investment in new technologies. Well-established energy systems promote success across all sectors, including business, medicine, communication, and education.

While the developed world has been the main culprit of greenhouse gas emissions, the effects of climate change are felt globally, and often it is the poorest populations who are least able to adapt their lifestyles. Therefore, renewable energy is an issue to be carefully considered by both developed countries with existing energy infrastructure and developing countries looking to expand energy access and reliability within their borders. A shift toward renewable generation also comes with significant impacts upon nations who rely on fossil fuel exports as their primary source of revenue, necessitating strategic planning to restructure entire economies. In discussing its clean energy goal, the UN states that energy is “central to nearly every major challenge and opportunity the world faces today” including jobs, security, food production, and raising income. Expanding renewable generation presents a key opportunity to transforms the lives and future of both our people and our planet.

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Submitted Position Papers

Renewable energy is becoming the technology of the future, and consequently, so, the use of nonrenewable sources is depleting. Due to the nation’s location in Sub-Saharan Africa, a lack of resources is an incredibly prevalent obstacle in building sustainable infrastructure. Equatorial Guinea managed to overcome that obstacle by introducing a renewable energy source: a hydraulic system. 

 

The delegation of Equatorial Guinea will be hosting the 5th Summit of the Gas Exporting Countries Forum, in hopes of gaining more cooperation amongst gas producing nations. 2019 has been named Equatorial Guinea Year of Energy, in which the summit will be its last event. Equatorial Guinea recognizes the potential of renewable energy and looks forward to discovering affordable ways of implementing infrastructure in LDCs and countries that hold a lesser advantage due to their location or economy.

 

In the process of becoming a more sustainable planet, Equatorial Guinea urges the nations to consider the countries that depend on gas, oil, and other energy sources as their main exports as well as their main source of economy.  In order to increase the renewable sources in nations, maintaining a successful infrastructure must be the first step.

  • : Equatorial Guinea
  • : Charlotte Howald

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Delegate: Owen Bishop

Country: Belgium

Committee: Environmental

Topic: Renewable Energy

 

A variety of UN reports have shown the clear and incredibly impactful negative impacts of climate change. This change is caused largely by human impacts from our over reliance on energy sources that release harmful greenhouse gasses such as fossil fuels. One of the most impactful results of these temperature changes is the rapid rise of sea levels around the globe. Belgium will be one of the most heavily impacted by these rising sea levels as approximately 6% of Belgium will be submerged by the end of the century. It is critical that the member nations of the UN work together to reduce these impacts by decreasing reliance on fossil fuels and increasing the use of renewable energy sources.

 

To help to slow down the increasing world temperature, it is critical that all nations make efforts to increase the use of renewable energy sources. To reach the goals previously set by the UN, it is critical that member nations consider a variety of sources for renewable power. These sources should include things such as solar, wind, and geothermal energy as well as nuclear energy. If we fail to move toward much higher percentages of energy from renewable sources soon this issue will continue to grow and become more difficult and costly to deal with in the future. Belgium is already moving towards a variety of renewable sources including both on and off shore wind power as well as being the country with the second highest percent use of nuclear power.

 

Many developing countries will have significantly more difficulty implementing increased renewable energy as these countries are already lacking widespread energy. To counteract these inequalities in ability to move towards renewable energies, any resolution passed should include increased pressure on more developed countries to move towards renewable energy as well as providing incentives for increasing renewable energy use. Belgium would favor policies similar to those that the UK has shown preference towards such as encouraging countries to invest in a variety of energy sources. This would not only help to reduce fossil fuel reliance but encouraging multiple types of energy sources would also allow for more flexibility and ability to react to new developments in climate change.

Work Cited:

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/be.html

https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climate-change/index.html

https://energytransition.org/2016/10/renewable-energy-in-belgium/

http://www.res-legal.eu/search-by-country/belgium/summary/c/belgium/s/res-e/sum/108/lpid/107/

http://www.flanderstoday.eu/current-affairs/six-percent-belgium-under-sea-level-end-century

 

  • : Belgium
  • : Owen Bishop

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Delegate: Cassie Chang

Country: Honduras

Committee: Environmental

Topic: Renewable energy

Honduras is a country in South America that has large renewable energy with fossil fuels disappearing. Fossil fuels were used for gas in cars and heating oil and natural gas to generate electricity. There is a downside to using/burning fossil fuels, they can harm the air that we breathe and fossil fuels release carbon dioxide which triggers the greenhouse effect and global warming. In Honduras, they expect to have an increase in energy consumption due to them being the 2nd largest country with a high renewable energy generation. 

 

Around 2 million of Honduras’s population has no access to electricity. They also produce and consume a lot of electricity for those who have access to it. Honduras would be happy to help those countries who are struggling to change from fossil fuels to renewable energy.

  • : Honduras
  • : Cassie Chang

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Country: Hungary

Committee: environmental (ECOSOC)

Topic: renewable energy

Delegate: Haoran Li

School: Troy High School

As pollution and climate change started to arise in recent years, more and more countries advocate for the use of renewable energies. In recent years, being able to access energy became fundamental for the daily life of many people, yet, there are still millions of people around the globe that lacks access to them. This issue concerned many countries and many actions were taken accordingly. 

The delegation of Hungary firmly acknowledges this issue and have participated fully in taking action. Hungary is a member of the European Union and thus takes part in the EU strategy to increase its share of Renewable energy. Along with other countries in the EU, we have adopted the 2009 Renewable Energy Directive, which included a 20% renewable energy target by 2020 for the EU. By 2030 wind should produce 26-35% of the EU’s electricity and save Europe €56 billion a year in avoided fuel costs. In addition to the collaboration with the EU, Hungary is also currently working on a project that aims to raise the share of renewable energy resources within gross final energy consumption to 20% by 2030. The plan projects capacity to generate electricity using renewable resources will reach more than 4,600 MW by 2030, including more than 4,000 MW of solar park capacity. The plan targets a possible 85% reduction in emissions over the same period. In 2017, we also worked on a scheme that helps our country to reduce CO2 emission and will support electricity using renewable resources via a feed-in tariff for installations under 500 kW and provide a premium over market prices for installations with a capacity of over 500 kW. Hungary will also partially open up the renewables support scheme to foreign producers as of 2017 to avoid discrimination. In Hungary’s National Renewable Energy Action Plan, we undertook to fulfill EU Commission requirements by ensuring it has a 14.65 per cent ratio of renewables within its gross final energy consumption by 2020. This is above the obligatory 13 per cent prescribed for Hungary as national overall target in the EU’s RED (Renewable Energy Directive)

Using renewable energy can benefit every country around the globe. The delegation of Hungary is delighted to collaborate with the international community to discuss further about renewable energy. We highly encourage other countries to take similar methods and action toward this issue. If all countries around the world are able to use renewable energy, then pollution can be greatly reduced. 

 

Works cited:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renewable_energy_in_Hungary

https://financialobserver.eu/recent-news/european-commission-approves-hungarian-renewable-energy-support-scheme/

 

  • : Hungary
  • : Haoran (Sara) Li

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Delegate: Haashir Ali

Country: Syria

Committee: Environmental

Topic: Renewable Energy

     As the world looks to sustain itself in the future after fossil fuels are gone, there is only one solution: renewable energy. The international community looks forward to using this in the future for a couple of reasons. Firstly, it provides for a fuel source for a long time to come in the foreseeable future once the current sources run out. Secondly, it limits the environmental impact of fossil fuel-based electricity because renewable sources do not have such toxic production methods.

     In the Syrian Arab Republic, much of the economy is based on energy production, specifically oil and natural gas. Due to its proximity to such valuable natural resources, Syria has a vested interest in the world energy market, as it is a major energy producer, a prominent member of OPEC, and RCREEE.

     The Syrian Government recently set a target in which 4.3% of the total energy production in the country should be based off of renewable sources by 2025. Currently 6% of all energy in the country comes from hydroelectric plants based off of dams that are meant to create reservoirs and provide for some of the countries electricity needs. Prior to 2011, the use of hydroelectricity was growing, and the government was on pace to meet its 4.3% energy production goal. However, due to the ongoing civil war, these efforts have since stagnated and have rapidly lost priority in recent years. Syria suffers from frequent energy blackouts due to armed conflict despite its vast amount of resources to draw upon for energy.

     One proposal to spread the influence of renewable energy is to finance nonprofit groups to go into different countries around the world. This can be through an NGO or a new body created by the United Nations. By helping spread awareness in this field, there is certainty that this can very well accelerate renewable energy usage to come.

     The second proposal is to help individual help with their logistics. Because poverty is one of the big reasons for renewable energy not becoming feasible, it would be best to start helping countries build up their own infrastructure to initiate the conversion from fossil fuels to renewable energy.

  • : Syria
  • : Haashir Ali

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Name: Om Shah

Country: United States of America

Committee: ECOSOC Environmental (UNEP)

Topic: Renewable Energy

United States of America – Renewable Energy

            What started out as a radical theory [1] slowly grew into one of the most hotly contested political topics in the United States of America. Carbon emissions and their effect on the climate have been thoroughly researched over the past decade. Even after thousands of separate studies were conducted, utilizing millions of dollars, [2] the results were found to be inconclusive. Yes, temperatures around the globe are increasing, but this is a natural phenomenon. [3] Scientists have found that temperature fluctuations are a constant phenomenon in the natural cycle of the Earth. Any claims that manmade fossil fuel emissions are changing the Earth’s climate are simply absurd and often, egocentric.

            Even the Radical Left Democrats have to admit that our data on global temperatures is extremely limited [4]. Weather patterns around the world were first officially recorded just over 100 years ago. [5] While this may seem to be enough data to make conclusions about the climate, the Earth has existed for over 4.5 billion years. [6] To reiterate, mankind has only gathered data from 0.00000002% of the Earth’s lifetime. Yet, scientists and the fake media are claiming to have a thorough understanding of the Earth’s long term climate patterns. If data was somehow obtained from the entirety of Earth’s existence, it would clearly indicate that the temperature is remaining relatively constant.

Even if it was found that the temperature rise of today is truly irregular, it would have no consequence of significant bearing upon the world. Even the most radical proponents of action on climate change estimate the global temperature rise to be 0.5°C. [7] This measly change isn’t doing anyone any harm. Climate change is clearly a liberal conspiracy, designed to scare the hardworking people of the United States of America and the rest of the world. Furthermore, many countries are advocating for action on climate change, simply to impede the progress of the United States of America, something President Donald J. Trump will not stand for. [8]

The President’s philosophy of “America First” [9] applies perfectly to climate change actions. The United States of America refuses to blindly follow the UN majority off a cliff. Along with most other solutions to climate change, renewable energy is a handicap for economic growth with no true benefits. [10] The only winner of renewable energy is the country that continues to operate using oil, achieving its maximum potential for economic growth, while “clean” countries struggle to keep up. The United States will not allow itself to fall victim to this ploy by other nations looking to surpass its economy. [11]

President Trump is a firm believer that the current system of oil-based energy is vastly superior to that of a renewable energy system. [12] One of the biggest advantages possessed by oil over renewable energies is the existing infrastructure. If renewable energies were truly implemented globally on a massive scale, the cost of construction would be enormous. Hundreds of millions of wind turbines, dams, and solar panels would have to be built in order to replace fossil fuel energy sources. [13] On the other hand, infrastructure for oil is already in place and would not cost the member states of the UN anything.

Even in poverty-stricken areas where energy infrastructure has not been built, oil is a better option than renewable energy. This is because building the infrastructure for oil is far cheaper than building the necessary infrastructure for renewable energy. One wind turbine, which is only sufficient for approximately 1,000 homes [14], can cost over $4 million to make. [15] While these projects may be feasible in the long run, the United States of America does not find it efficient to spend so much money on building infrastructure that is unnecessary.

As previously established, there is no environmental incentive to invest in renewable energy, since climate change is simply not a concern. Thus, the only motivation for the United States of America to invest in renewable energy would be economic. In this area, the United States of America is open to compromise. If renewable energies can be undoubtedly proven to be more cost-efficient than fossil fuels, President Trump will not hesitate to support a UNEP resolution endorsing renewable.

However, this is simply not the case currently. Taking initial fixed costs into account, every form of renewable energy has been shown to be more expensive. [16] This is especially true on a large scale. If the United States of America were to switch to mainly renewable energies, it would mark the single largest cessation of fossil fuels in history. A shift this massive is simply not comparable to a small nation going net-zero. In order to truly create economic motivation to employ renewable energy, research and development are clearly necessary. However, the United States of America refuses to foot the bill for the United Nations once again. Seeing as the United States comprises of 4.67% of the global population, [17] the United States will not fund a penny more than 4.67% of any research fund dedicated to renewable energy.

The United States of America looks forward to working with many other countries in UNEP, such as the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) nations and other rapidly industrializing economies. In addition, the United States expects to collaborate with other oil-producing countries such as those in OPEC.


  • : United States of America
  • : Om Shah

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ECOSOC ENVIRONMENTAL

RENEWABLE ENERGY

 


 

Australia

Molly Capelli

Troy High School

 


 

The issue of global climate change has been steadily increasing in the past few years. The Paris Climate Agreement was a global effort to reduce carbon emissions, which has been helpful in its endeavor, in conjunction with the Sustainable Development Goals enacted in 2015. 

 

In Australia, one of the major concerns is the bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef. The increase of carbon emissions means increased oceanic temperatures and therefore a higher pH level, thus meaning shells cannot be made for oceanic crustaceans and coral reefs. In addition, rising global temperatures means longer fire seasons, which can be detrimental to Australian agriculture alongside droughts. 

 

Australia believes both climate change mitigation and climate change adaptation is needed to solve current issues and prevent further damage from occurring. Mitigation may reduce the ultimate extent of climate change and its impacts, but requires global solutions and cooperation, while adaptation can be performed at national and local levels. Mitigation consists of acting to limit the long-term magnitude of climate change, while adaptation refers to dealing with current climate issues.  

 

Australia has an ample amount of renewable energy that can be used in place of current fossil fuels. For example, the Snowy Mountain Scheme is a hydroelectric system that is used. Another example is HydroTasmania. In addition, Australia uses lots of wind power, such as the Cathedral Rocks wind farm in South Australia. This wind farm has 33 wind turbines. Furthermore, Australia supports the use of solar photovoltaics which can be used to generate solar energy. GreenPower is Australia’s government managed accreditation program helping the nation transition to renewable energy above and beyond legislated targets. GreenPower accredited renewable energy is electricity which produces no net greenhouse gas emissions. Australia believes programs like GreenPower can be implemented globally. 

 

The delegation of Australia realizes, however, most nations do not have the financial resources or viable resources to implement such programs and practices. This is why we promote the idea of local adaptation measures including improving education and information awareness. In addition, we promote ideas of conservationism and sustainability when looking at, not only energy practices but all activities which impact global climate change. 

Sources:

 

https://www.energyaustralia.com.au/home/electricity-and-gas/green-energy-plans

 

  • : Australia
  • : Molly Capelli

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The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea has been observing the current problem with renewable energy. Renewable energy is fundamentL part of daily life for billions of people around the world; however, today there are still almost one billion people who lack access to functioning electricity, half of whom can be found in sub-Saharan Africa alone. The United Nations has shown commitment to this mission by establishing “Affordable and Clean Energy” as the seventh of its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set out in 2015. 

 

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea relies on coal, hydropower and petroleum product for most of its energy needs but renewable sources such as biomass, waste, and solar panels also supply energy in the residential sector.  Renewable energy is good for the environment as we take advantage of the natural sources to make renewable energy. 

 

As an environmental committee, we need to think for the greater good of all the people. We need to make access to renewable energy for all the people, especially countries in Africa as they do not have the infrastructure to make renewable energy. As the background guide says “there are still almost one billion people who lack access to functioning electricity, half of whom can be found in sub-Saharan Africa”. 

 

This committee should focus on getting access to renewable energy for the countries who are in need of it. We should give every person of the world access to renewable energy so we can make this world a better place and do not have to worry about renewable energy when 2030 hits. 

 

  • : Democratic People's Republic of Korea
  • : Nicolas Gonzalez

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Delegate: Victor Schmitt

Country: India

Committee: Environmental

Topic: Renewable Energy

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution, fossil fuels have powered much progress in our society, and allowed us to grow as a planet. However these fossil fuels have been a major threat to our climate and can be very harmful. Because of the increased cost of renewable energy, developing countries are forced to use fossil fuels, as they are cheaper and are the only form of energy available to them.

 

India has the fourth largest greenhouse gas emission in the planet, constituting about 7% of the global total. India is already a signatory for the Paris Agreement, striving to make progress in reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, but there is still much progress to be made. India has the largest production of energy from renewable sources, with 35 percent of its electricity generation from renewable energy. India’s goal is to reach 57 percent of its total electricity generation from non-fossil fuel sources by 2027. The increase of greenhouse gas emissions is mostly due to countries such as China or the United States, that have the 2 biggest greenhouse gas emissions in the world. This issue must be resolved in cooperation with these countries, as they have the methods to switch to renewable energy, where developing countries do not.

  • : India
  • : Victor Schmitt

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Topic: Renewable Energy 

Nation: Japan 

Committee: ECOSOC

Renewable Energy is a topic widely discussed in the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), and is a growing necessity internationally. The use of energy is a fundamental part of everyday life for billions of people worldwide, and while millions of people do not have access to energy, the burden the generation of energy has on the environment must be considered. The daily use of energy in many nations intensifies the obligation to find renewable ways to harness energy. Renewable energy is becoming increasingly necessary as climate change continues to worsen. Renewable energy will prove to be as effective, if not more effective than other methods of harnessing energy; as the costs of renewable energy sources has rapidly declined in many nations around the world, and have become competitive with fossil fuels. Renewable energy is not only comparable to fossil fuels in cost, but in power and profitability as well.  As of 2015, approximately 23% of international electricity was generated from renewable sources, and it is projected that 31% will come from renewable sources by 2040 (The U.S Energy Information Administration). The United Nations (specifically ECOSOC) has shown its dedication to the topic of Renewable Energy in the “Sustainable Development Goals”, goal 7, “Affordable and Clean Energy”. ECOSOC also formed the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in 2015. IRENA works to transform renewable energy as a center for knowledge and innovation, and has 160 members as of 2019, including Japan. 

Japan is a top market for all renewable energy products globally. The delegation is ranked 2nd in the world by the Department of Commerce for having renewable energy opportunities. Japan currently produces 10% of its energy from renewable resources, but we hope to increase that to 25% by 2030. Japan is in support of the development of renewable energy sources, as it would benefit considerably from renewable energy not only because it will significantly reduce the carbon footprint of the nation, but it will be cost beneficial, as Japan heavily depends on fossil fuels, coals, oils, and natural gases that have been imported. In 2012, Japan implemented the Feed-in Tariff system (FIT), to promote renewable energy development, and has resulted in a steady increase of energy generation from renewable sources. Similarly, the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI) was also formed to enforce laws and regulations based around renewable energy, and implementing the FIT system in Japan. Additionally in 2016, Japan the Port and Harbor Law was enacted to push for the use of coastline winds as a way to generate energy. Japan is also home to 73 of the world’s largest floating solar plants, as a way to harness the power from the sun.Japan recognizes that the oil industry is a large part of the economy in many nations; however, it is worth noting that over 6.5 million people internationally were employed by renewable technology in 2013. 

Renewable energy is beneficial to all nations, as all nations are susceptible to falling in the face of climate change. The delegation of Japan believes that in order to address the necessary international use of renewable energy, we, as an international community must first recognize the severity of the climate crisis at hand, and realize that immediate action must be taken. Second, we must be willing to share new renewable energy technology and resources with each other, with the end goal being to increase the overall use of renewable energy. Third, Japan believes that coastal nations with high levels of offshore winds must install wind turbines to harness wind power. Similarly, Japan believes that coastal nations should install offshore solar power plants, with similar structures to that of Japan’s offshore plant in Kagoshima Bay. Renewable energy is something that every nation can benefit from, which is why the Delegation of Japan is looking forward to collaborating with other nations to reach a consensus regarding possible solutions to increase the use of renewable energy,  and increase general access to energy. 







Topic: Renewable Energy 

Nation: Japan 

Committee: ECOSOC

Renewable Energy is a topic widely discussed in the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), and is a growing necessity internationally. The use of energy is a fundamental part of everyday life for billions of people worldwide, and while millions of people do not have access to energy, the burden the generation of energy has on the environment must be considered. The daily use of energy in many nations intensifies the obligation to find renewable ways to harness energy. Renewable energy is becoming increasingly necessary as climate change continues to worsen. Renewable energy will prove to be as effective, if not more effective than other methods of harnessing energy; as the costs of renewable energy sources has rapidly declined in many nations around the world, and have become competitive with fossil fuels. Renewable energy is not only comparable to fossil fuels in cost, but in power and profitability as well.  As of 2015, approximately 23% of international electricity was generated from renewable sources, and it is projected that 31% will come from renewable sources by 2040 (The U.S Energy Information Administration). The United Nations (specifically ECOSOC) has shown its dedication to the topic of Renewable Energy in the “Sustainable Development Goals”, goal 7, “Affordable and Clean Energy”. ECOSOC also formed the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in 2015. IRENA works to transform renewable energy as a center for knowledge and innovation, and has 160 members as of 2019, including Japan. 

Japan is a top market for all renewable energy products globally. The delegation is ranked 2nd in the world by the Department of Commerce for having renewable energy opportunities. Japan currently produces 10% of its energy from renewable resources, but we hope to increase that to 25% by 2030. Japan is in support of the development of renewable energy sources, as it would benefit considerably from renewable energy not only because it will significantly reduce the carbon footprint of the nation, but it will be cost beneficial, as Japan heavily depends on fossil fuels, coals, oils, and natural gases that have been imported. In 2012, Japan implemented the Feed-in Tariff system (FIT), to promote renewable energy development, and has resulted in a steady increase of energy generation from renewable sources. Similarly, the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI) was also formed to enforce laws and regulations based around renewable energy, and implementing the FIT system in Japan. Additionally in 2016, Japan the Port and Harbor Law was enacted to push for the use of coastline winds as a way to generate energy. Japan is also home to 73 of the world’s largest floating solar plants, as a way to harness the power from the sun.Japan recognizes that the oil industry is a large part of the economy in many nations; however, it is worth noting that over 6.5 million people internationally were employed by renewable technology in 2013. 

Renewable energy is beneficial to all nations, as all nations are susceptible to falling in the face of climate change. The delegation of Japan believes that in order to address the necessary international use of renewable energy, we, as an international community must first recognize the severity of the climate crisis at hand, and realize that immediate action must be taken. Second, we must be willing to share new renewable energy technology and resources with each other, with the end goal being to increase the overall use of renewable energy. Third, Japan believes that coastal nations with high levels of offshore winds must install wind turbines to harness wind power. Similarly, Japan believes that coastal nations should install offshore solar power plants, with similar structures to that of Japan’s offshore plant in Kagoshima Bay. Renewable energy is something that every nation can benefit from, which is why the Delegation of Japan is looking forward to collaborating with other nations to reach a consensus regarding possible solutions to increase the use of renewable energy,  and increase general access to Topic: Renewable Energy 

Nation: Japan 

Committee: ECOSOC

Renewable Energy is a topic widely discussed in the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), and is a growing necessity internationally. The use of energy is a fundamental part of everyday life for billions of people worldwide, and while millions of people do not have access to energy, the burden the generation of energy has on the environment must be considered. The daily use of energy in many nations intensifies the obligation to find renewable ways to harness energy. Renewable energy is becoming increasingly necessary as climate change continues to worsen. Renewable energy will prove to be as effective, if not more effective than other methods of harnessing energy; as the costs of renewable energy sources has rapidly declined in many nations around the world, and have become competitive with fossil fuels. Renewable energy is not only comparable to fossil fuels in cost, but in power and profitability as well.  As of 2015, approximately 23% of international electricity was generated from renewable sources, and it is projected that 31% will come from renewable sources by 2040 (The U.S Energy Information Administration). The United Nations (specifically ECOSOC) has shown its dedication to the topic of Renewable Energy in the “Sustainable Development Goals”, goal 7, “Affordable and Clean Energy”. ECOSOC also formed the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in 2015. IRENA works to transform renewable energy as a center for knowledge and innovation, and has 160 members as of 2019, including Japan. 

Japan is a top market for all renewable energy products globally. The delegation is ranked 2nd in the world by the Department of Commerce for having renewable energy opportunities. Japan currently produces 10% of its energy from renewable resources, but we hope to increase that to 25% by 2030. Japan is in support of the development of renewable energy sources, as it would benefit considerably from renewable energy not only because it will significantly reduce the carbon footprint of the nation, but it will be cost beneficial, as Japan heavily depends on fossil fuels, coals, oils, and natural gases that have been imported. In 2012, Japan implemented the Feed-in Tariff system (FIT), to promote renewable energy development, and has resulted in a steady increase of energy generation from renewable sources. Similarly, the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI) was also formed to enforce laws and regulations based around renewable energy, and implementing the FIT system in Japan. Additionally in 2016, Japan the Port and Harbor Law was enacted to push for the use of coastline winds as a way to generate energy. Japan is also home to 73 of the world’s largest floating solar plants, as a way to harness the power from the sun.Japan recognizes that the oil industry is a large part of the economy in many nations; however, it is worth noting that over 6.5 million people internationally were employed by renewable technology in 2013. 

Renewable energy is beneficial to all nations, as all nations are susceptible to falling in the face of climate change. The delegation of Japan believes that in order to address the necessary international use of renewable energy, we, as an international community must first recognize the severity of the climate crisis at hand, and realize that immediate action must be taken. Second, we must be willing to share new renewable energy technology and resources with each other, with the end goal being to increase the overall use of renewable energy. Third, Japan believes that coastal nations with high levels of offshore winds must install wind turbines to harness wind power. Similarly, Japan believes that coastal nations should install offshore solar power plants, with similar structures to that of Japan’s offshore plant in Kagoshima Bay. Renewable energy is something that every nation can benefit from, which is why the Delegation of Japan is looking forward to collaborating with other nations to reach a consensus regarding possible solutions to increase the use of renewable energy,  and increase general access to energy globally.

  • : Japan
  • : Sydney Levy

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Submitted To: Renewable Energy

From: Romania

 

Romania is dedicated to the cause of finding reliable energy solutions for the ever-growing world that are renewable, in support of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals set out by the UN in 2015.

As a signatory of the 2016 Paris Climate Agreement, Romania wholeheartedly supports the move toward sustainable and renewable energy production, as Romania’s hydroelectric power generation produces a third of the country’s energy. Between 1989 and 1999, Romania’s greenhouse gas emissions decreased by roughly 50%, and as of 2017, 59.87% of Romania’s electric power was provided by low-carbon sources such as nuclear power, wind power, and hydroelectric power. The increase of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and the extensive use of carbon-based energy sources such as coal and natural gas is largely due to the influence of first-world countries such as the United States and China, emitting 5,107.393 and 10,877.218 Mt of CO2/yr as of 2017 statistics. This is damaging to developing countries that do not have methods of dealing with the havoc greenhouse emissions can wreak on their environment.

Renewable energy sources must be utilized and mandated to slow the process of global warming and to soften the impact the phenomena has on developing countries.




Works Cited:

 

https://www.minind.ro/energie/PNAER_final.pdf 

 

“Romania.” Worldmark Encyclopedia of the Nations, edited by Melissa Sue Hill, 14th ed., vol. 5: Europe, Gale, 2017, pp. 619-639. Gale In Context: High School, https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/CX3652100276/SUIC?u=lom_royaloakschs&sid=SUIC&xid=c43fd3e7. Accessed 15 Nov. 2019.  



  • : Romania
  • : Jack Merten

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Renewable energy is an alternative and replenishable energy that is derived from sources like the sun, rivers, wind, hot springs, tides, and biomass. The use of renewable energy is essential as it makes use of energy that cannot be depleted and causes little harm, unlike fossil fuels. Fossil fuels are abundant and cheap and have been circulated throughout the globe for ages, yet they pose a terrible threat to our climate if we continue to burn them for energy. Despite this threat, many underdeveloped countries are left unable to implement the safer energy, for fossil fuels are a finite and cheap source and they simply don’t have the funds to switch. Such is the case for countries like Nigeria.

 

Renewable energy is in the developmental phase for Nigeria with our only renewable source being hydro power and biomass. We only have the ability to supply about half of the population of 198 million people due to lack of funding, so implementing more sources of renewable energy may be a heavy burden. Although the current amount is bare, Nigeria has still been gradually pushing for more advances in wind and solar energy. In 2003, the Nigerian Government introduced renewable energy as part of its National Energy Policy. A Renewable Energy Master Plan (REMP) pushes Nigeria to achieve many goals in the development and implementation of renewable energy sources. Almost 35 percent of rural residents are left frustrated by the abundance of sun energy left to waste, but if given ample funding and efforts, then the REMP can be executed and the excess sun can be utilized.

 

Nigeria hopes for a way to make use of the plethora of unused renewable resources in undeveloped countries. In order to be able to implement these sources instead of fossil fuels, these countries are in dire need for funding. As a proposal, cooperation between higher developed countries is a must. With the funds from wealthier countries to support organizations like the Renewable Association of Nigeria (REAN) having more environmentally safe electricity will be a reality.   

  • : Nigeria
  • : Makena Bodzianowski

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Topic: Renewable Energy

Nation: Qatar

Committee: ECOSOC

 

The need for renewable energy, in developing as well as developed nations, is growing steadily along with climate change and the demand for access to cheap and efficient sources of energy.  The burning of fossil fuels releases greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, directly leading to a steady rise in the average global temperature which leads to rising sea levels as glacial and polar ice melts. According to the Fifth Assessment Report of the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), from 1880 to 2012, the global temperature has risen by 0.85 °C (1.53 °F), which, according to NASA, is causing Arctic ice to melt at a rate of 12.85% per decade, based on trends from 1981 to 2010.  This has lead to the rise of sea levels. According to the Fifth Assessment Report of the IPCC, sea levels have risen 19cm (7.5 inches) from 1901 to 2010. Renewable energy helps minimize the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, which is vitally important as these trends keep rising. Not only does renewable energy help slow climate change, but also provides access to energy quickly and at relatively low cost, which is extremely important in developing countries. Renewable energy also increases the reliability and resilience of the energy system, which helps prevent power shortages in large storms as well a scan help cities recover faster from natural disasters.

Previously, Qatar has demonstrated it support for renewable energy, quickly agreeing to many treaties regarding the topic, such as the UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) in 1996, the Kyoto Protocol in 2005, and the Paris Agreement in 2017. Additionally, Qatar has been the leading supplier of LNG (liquified natural gas) for over a decade, as liquified natural gas releases less than half of the carbon dioxide than coal and oil (although, if burned without caution, LNG can cause methane leakage, which is more detrimental to the environment than excess CO2). While LNG is not a renewable energy source and is not a permanent solution, it is a suitable intermediate step between nonrenewable energy sources and renewable energy sources. Qatar has also begun undertaking a massive project to construct a 500MW solar plant, and hopes to have the plant completed by 2020.

In order to diminish the exacerbation of climate change, Qatar believes that nations who rely heavily on coal and oil should switch to LNG, as long as they have the abilities to burn it with the assurance of minimal methane leakages. While this is not an everlasting fix to climate change, it will help nations as they transition into a variety of permanent renewable energy sources. With regard to renewable energy sources, Qatar believes that solar power is extremely important. With solar power being the leading source of energy in developing countries, having module prices drop by 90% since 2010, solar power is cheap, accessible, and efficient, and solar home systems are becoming more popular in developing nations with large gaps in energy access. However, as solar power is not as strong in all regions of the world and it is not plausible for most nations to solely rely on solar power.  As a result, greater investments in the worldwide development of renewable energy technology should be made in order to reduce cost and increase the diversity and application of renewable energy.

 

Works Cited:

“Arctic Sea Ice Minimum.” NASA, NASA, 2 Oct. 2019, https://climate.nasa.gov/vital-signs/arctic-sea-ice/

Ataullah, Sanaulla. “Qatar to Adopt First Renewable Energy Strategy.” The Peninsula Qatar, 27 Nov. 2017, https://www.thepeninsulaqatar.com/article/27/11/2017/Qatar-to-adopt-first-renewable-energy-strategy.

“Climate Change.” United Nations, United Nations, https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climate-change/

“Doha Metro.” Railway Technology, Verdict Media Limited, https://www.railway-technology.com/projects/doha-metro/

 “Energy, from The Report: Qatar 2019.” Oxford Business Group, 22 July 2019, https://oxfordbusinessgroup.com/qatar-2019/energy.

Mathiesen, Karl. “What Is Holding Back the Growth of Solar Power?” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 31 Jan. 2016, https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2016/jan/31/solar-power-what-is-holding-back-growth-clean-energy.

“Energy.” World Bank, The World Bank Group, 11 Oct. 2019, https://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/energy/overview.

Pratap, John. “Qatar’s Renewable Energy Solutions Set to Advance Significantly in 2019: OBG Report.” PressReader.com – Your Favorite Newspapers and Magazines., 10 Apr. 2019, https://www.pressreader.com/qatar/gulf-times-business/20190410/281719795962820.

 “Qatar Develops a 500-MW Solar Plant.” Oxford Business Group, 23 Aug. 2019,  https://oxfordbusinessgroup.com/analysis/flare-innovation-500-mw-solar-plant-leads-energy-diversification-efforts.

 “Qatar Makes Great Efforts in Addressing Climate Change.” The Peninsula Qatar, 21 Sept. 2019, https://www.thepeninsulaqatar.com/article/21/09/2019/Qatar-makes-great-efforts-in-addressing-climate-change.

Shah, Anup. “Why Is Biodiversity Important? Who Cares?” – Global Issues, 19 Jan. 2014, http://www.globalissues.org/article/170/why-is-biodiversity-important-who-cares#targetText=Biodiversity%20boosts%20ecosystem%20productivity%20where,sustainability%20for%20all%20life%20forms.

“Why Is Renewable Energy Important?” REN21, 23 Aug. 2019, https://www.ren21.net/why-is-renewable-energy-important/.

 

Zafar, Salman. “Solar Energy in Qatar.” EcoMENA, 20 May 2018, https://www.ecomena.org/solar-energy-in-qatar/.

 

  • : Qatar
  • : Andrew Mojares

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Committee: United Nations Environmental Programme

Topic: Renewable Energy 

Country: Republic of Costa Rica 

Delegate: Catherine Hwang, Forest Hills Northern High School 

 

Although energy is a fundamental aspect of everyday life among citizens, according to the Energy Access Outlook of 2017, 14% of the global population does not have access to electricity. While solving the issue of providing electricity for everyone, we must begin to do so in an environmentally friendly manner. Globally, carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels have increased by about 2.7 percent in 2018 after a 1.6 increase in 2017. The role of renewable energy solutions mitigates climate change. The 2016 Paris Agreement marked the imperativeness of implementing renewable sources to replace fossil fuels which have been recognized to be the biggest contributor to climate change. 

Costa Rica has focused on environmental sustainability from the outsiders and has recently taken affirmative actions to pioneer the future of running on renewable energy sources to better the climate and environment whilst providing the same necessary components of energy to daily citizens. The Costa Rican Institute of Electricity was established in 1949 as a way to solve the sizes of electric energy availability in the country. Costa Rica has made tremendous progress, for almost 100% of the country’s energy is now produced through 5 different renewable sources and has been for the past 4 years. Approximately 78 percent is generated through hydropower, 10 percent wind, 10 percent geothermal energy, and 1 percent solar and biomass energy. Costa Rica hosts more than 5 percent of the world’s biodiversity, and the country utilizes key components of the environment to carry out these functions. Costa Rica has worked with several countries such as China to help finance the installation of renewable generators. Recently, Costa Rica has implemented over 50,000 solar panels, three 50 MW geothermal power plants, and 305.5 MW hydroelectric plants to set power to over half a million homes in the nation. Costa Rica also strives to achieve carbon neutrality within the next few years to further its contribution to resolving the issue regarding sustainable and renewable energy to better their climate and environment. 

 

Costa Rica highly encourages the countries represented in the United Nations Environmental Programme to cooperate in hopes of setting goals and attaining similar milestones. With the financial aid of more affluent countries, Costa Rica recognizes that lesser developed countries can continue to work on providing basic necessities such as electricity to their citizens while doing so in an environmentally friendly manner by implementing renewable resources generators to provide such power. These tasks must be carried out in a responsible and cooperative manner among the members of the committee to establish a firm resolution in which countries can strive to begin converting to renewable resources. 

 

  • : Republic of Costa Rica
  • : Catherine Hwang

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Since the western industrial revolution, fossil fuels have powered our globe and advanced society. Unfortunately, these resources, though cheap and plentiful, have come at a cost. Coal mines can be dangerous to work in, and have exploited child labor, while fossil fuel burning has polluted our air and waterways. Fossil fuel supplies are finite, and some scientists estimate that the global gas and coal supply could become a serious concern within the next fifty to one hundred years. To reduce the effects of climate change and secure our childrens’ futures, the global community must invest in and continue the innovation of renewable energy in its many forms. 

 

In 2017 the Republic of Argentina declared a year of renewable energy. Maxed-out, unreliable fossil-fuel generated power grids left our capitol, Buenos Aires and other cities vulnerable to dangerous blackouts. To improve national infrastructure and meet renewable energy goals by 2025, Argentina partnered with the International Finance Corporation and other development institutions to create renewable-energy auctions. Because these auctions are backed by reputable international financial organizations, private investors’ financial risks are reduced and the auctions have been extremely successful, bidding off more than 2,400 megawatts of energy to primarily wind and solar companies, which are estimated to bring in $3.5 billion over the next two years. Our nation has avoided public debt and is even looking to expand our Paris Climate Change commitment thanks to these renewable-energy initiatives. Argentina currently uses many sources of sustainable energy including hydroelectricity, biomass, wind, solar and peaceful nuclear power.

 

The UNEP’s renewable energy discussion must focus on infrastructure development as a means of improving quality of life and recognize the role that green energy can play in spurring economic prosperity and scientific innovation. As Argentina has experienced firsthand, partnerships between developing nations and global financing corporations offer a promising future in cost-efficient growth. Protecting the environment is a transnational challenge, and demands a policy of common but differentiated responsibilities among developed and developing nations.

 

Green energy is good for human and economic development, the conservation of natural resources, and slowing the release of greenhouse gas emissions. Argentina looks forward to discussing the peaceful transition towards a more sustainably fueled world.

  • : Republic of Argentina
  • : Elizabeth Vredevelt

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Iran has grown in their use of fossil fuels.  Before 1954 Iran was very good with their use of fossil fuels, not really exposing CO2 into the environment.  Since 1954 Iran’s use of fossil fuels has gone up substantially. Every year since then it has gone up by 6.3%.  Now in current times the amount of fossil fuels used account for 43% of Iran’s emissions.  

 

Only 0.2% of energy produced by Iran is renewable energy.  Iran has been thinking of implementing ways to stop the use of fossil fuels such as green energy.  Iran is the most advanced in its development of renewable energy, mostly due to its past investments in hydropower schemes. Lately, however, it has been taking big strides in terms of wind and solar power, with a slew of new projects announced over the past few months.

 

Iran stands with the belief of using green energy rather than fossil fuels.  However, due to lack of money and financial issues it would be hard to implement this in most countries.  The fossil fuel consumption as of 2014 in Iran is 98.99%, which is dangerously high compared to most countries.   However Iran has been working hard to rid themselves of this problem by putting their money and time towards renewable energy.

 

  • : Iran
  • : Mitchell Kovacic

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United Nations Environmental Program 

Renewable Energy

Seychelles

Natalie Tinklenberg

Mattawan High School

 

The effects of climate change are obvious to all; allowing opportunities for counties to make the switch to renewable energy could mean a difference for present and future generations. There are multiple options that can be used to combat the growing issues of climate change and the effects that fossil fuels have on it. A few of many options include solar power, wind energy, tidal power, geothermal, and nuclear power. Solar power has become a very popular option for many as prices are lowering for this option are lowering. However, the environment and climate of the country need to be kept in mind when deciding which option will provide the most energy and benefits. Climate change is affecting the safety of those in many countries, as studies have shown climate change amplifying the intensity of natural disasters. Climate change also has its effects on food production because the change in temperature and rainfall can kill crops from year to year. Thus, climate change has an effect on many aspects of life making it important that steps are taken to combat and prevent it from growing worse.

 

In an attempt to join the fight, Seychelles joined the 2016 Parris Agreement. For years, Seychelles had relied on unclean energy sources like fossil fuels; however, Seychelles has a policy in place to work towards 15% of its energy coming from renewable sources by 2030. In 2012, wind plants were set up to supply six megawatts of energy to citizens. As recent as June 2019, Seychelles has begun the process of creating floating solar panels in the providence lagoon on Mahé island. The panels will not become functional until 2020, but this shows the commitment Seychelles has to clean energy. Overall, Seychelles has been committed to efforts that support clean energy and will continue to support these efforts in the United Nations.

 

When resolutions begin to be crafted, it is important to keep in mind the many variables that may make it a struggle for countries to turn to clean and renewable energy. For countries that are not in a position to fund renewable energy plants, it crucial that they are given the funding and materials needed to switch. If a country is not using its funding to take steps toward clean energy, then the funding should lessen or be cut off. Ultimately, cooperation is crucial in the fight against climate change through renewable energy.

  • : Seychelles
  • : Natalie Tinklenberg

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United Nations Environmental Programme 

Renewable Energy 

United Kingdom 

Gabby Flint 

Mattawan High School

 

When fossil fuels are burned, not only is carbon dioxide released into the air, but so is mercury, sulfur dioxide, benzyne, and formaldehyde. Since 1985, the depletion in the Ozone layer has raised the concern of destruction of vital ecosystems. The United Nations, however,  released a statement in 2018 saying that the Ozone layer within the Northern Hemisphere could be fully restored by the 2030’s with cleaner, renewable energy sources. Cleaner renewable energy sources would cut down on gas emissions, aiding in improved air quality along with restoration of the atmosphere. The United Kingdom sees the value of renewable energy sources, such as wind, solar, and water and strongly believes in the value of implementing such energy sources.

Renewable energy has become a very viable and important source of energy that the United Kingdom. Out of the total energy generated, 30% of it comes from renewable energy sourced. The top renewable energy sources in the UK are wind power and solar power. Within wind energy, offshore and onshore wind plants create large sources of energy. Being completely surrounded, the wind speeds become high enough for wind energy to become a viable energy source for the United Kingdom. In 2012, the UK government published a statement that by the year 2020, 16% of all homes ( 4 million homes out of 25 million homes ) will be powered by solar energy. Hopefully by 2025, the United Kingdom government hopes to close down all of the coal powered plants, which will make the United Kingdom a country with an electricity system that produces zero carbon. This action would make the UK a leading nation in a cleaner energy system. 

 

The United Kingdom would favor for this committee to put policies in place to mandate that every member nation have a minimum of 2 types of renewable energy in place to make the majority of the particular nation’s energy supply coming from renewable, clean energy. The UK is open to giving aid to nations unable to economically support such policies. The United Kingdom is hoping for open collaboration on this topic and for a solution that works for all to be reached. 

 

  • : United KIngdom
  • : Gabby Flint

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United Nations Environment Programme

Renewable Energy

France

Oliver Shapton

 

Currently, global warming is on the rise, impacting the sustainability and health of our ecosystem, as well as the lives of each human on this planet. In the past, we have fell on the reliance of energy sources such as fossil fuels, but in the current day these inefficient energy sources have only lead to a threat on our world. Because of global warming, our water levels have increased exponentially, greenhouse gas levels have reached dangerous levels, leading to damaging impacts on the health of individuals. Not only is the use of gas, coal, and oil, horrible to the environment, but they are unrealistic. Within 52 years gas will run out, followed by oil a year later, and 150 years from now, coal will disappear. Not only is renewable energy an issue for developed countries, but those underdeveloped can’t even produce energy through methods such as gas and oil. Renewable energy is a must in order for our future to be sustainable and healthy for not only developed countries, but for every individual. 

 

France has seen the failures of energy sources such as gas and coal, and works to continue to develop renewable energy sources to replace those that have failed us and our environment in the past. In 2014, 14.3% of France’s energy consumption came from wood, hydroelectricity, and biofuels. Later in 2015, are renewable energy production consumption increased to 23%. Because of this increase in renewable energy, France not only benefited the environment, but created 2,000 new jobs in just one sector of renewable energy. Through the development of the Energy Transition Green Growth Act, France has implemented tireless goals to continue to increase renewable energy. 

 

In order for a hopeful future, our nations must come together to create policies to promote renewable energy. France promotes the development of policies and organizations to continue to test the benefit of renewable energy through wind, biogas, marine sources, geothermics, and many other sustainable sources. However in order for these concepts to be tested and developed, we must work together to produce funding in order for a healthy future to even be possible. Further, it is essential that we do not only focus on the needs of developed countries, but develop renewable energy sources that would be designed for those that don’t have any energy to begin with.

 

Through the implementation of policies and organizations listed above, France aims to create a world in which renewable energy allows for efficient energy for all individuals, while putting an end to global warming before it is too late.

  • : France
  • : Oliver Shapton

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Climate change is becoming more of a prominent issue and increasing renewable energy sources has been acknowledged. The burning of fossil fuels is creating more and more environmental downfalls. Expanding energy resources, especially those of renewable ones, are incredibly important to the future condition of the planet. The United Nations establishment of the “Affordable and Clean Energy” mission in 2015 shows the international goal of meeting climate goals. 

 

About 25.8% of the Peruvian population are considered below the national poverty line, those mostly located in the Andean Highlands. These poor families generally have no access to certain services including that of clean energy. Because of the inexpensive alternatives to electricity, many use fuelwood and households with better incomes use liquefied petroleum gas. The Pan American Health Organization has shown studies that correlate this inefficient use of biomass to respiratory problems. According to the Peruvian Society of Renewable Energies (SPR), at the end of 2017, only 2.7% of Peruvian energy comes from renewable energy sources. “The demand for energy will increase considerably. If we do not diversify the sources, we will have to use our oil reserves, which is highly polluting and also has a high price, “says Coronado, president of the SPR. Peru understands the imperative need for a greater diversification to battle the climate change as well as protect the economy. 

 

“The demand for energy will increase considerably. If we do not diversify the sources, we will have to use our oil reserves, which is highly polluting and also has a high price, “says Coronado. Peru recently has been expanding the reform of its energy policy to more renewable energy penetration over a larger area and to more communities. The government expects to install around 260,000 solar panels by 2021 by its total electrification plan and funding electricity generation and transmission projects. The delegation of Peru suggests the sale of renewable energy through public tenders, which also includes incentives to prioritize the dispatch of electricity. Projects, which could be funded through community cooperation and international partnership, of establishing more sources of renewable energy like solar panels and other electricity generation points.

  • : Peru
  • : Christine Huynh

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Country: United Mexican States

Committee: Environmental (ECOSOC)

Topic: Renewable Energy

Delegate: Anthony Moncman

School: Saginaw Arts and Sciences Academy

 

The inveterate problems that have arisen from using inefficient and unsustainable energy practices have ramifications that can be seen through the present day; they also possess an unassailable threat to the future to the survival of our species. Many of these unsustainable energy practices include the use of fossil fuels over more environmentally-conscious alternatives. The burning of many of these fossil fuels results in the emission of greenhouse gases that will be stored in the atmosphere and gradually reflects and traps heat on the Earth’s surface. The results of this have been and will continue to be very grievous, as many ecosystems have already begun to be distressed. There have been many suggested alternatives to unsustainable energy practices, generally being renewable energy. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), “Renewable power capacity is set to expand by 50% between 2019 and 2024.” This transformation is projected to come largely from solar PV energy, which has the potential to be sustainable, efficient, and economically stable. Despite the assumed increase in solar energy, it should also be noted that hydropower has increased dramatically in use, from nearly under 1000 TWh in 1965 to more than 4000 TWh in 2016. However, the increased use of these means of renewable energy has not been seen in a large enough scale to begin limiting climate change nearly enough, as renewable energy resources are still second to traditional methods of fuel.

 

Mexico has long been aware and humbled by the growing need for renewable energy sources to dominate the energy market. In 2012 the highly ambitious law passed by the Mexican government stating that Mexico’s intentions were to increase the amount of renewable energy produced to 34% by 2024 and 50% by 2050. In 2018 the Mexican government was to build a highly organized wind farm that had amassed the same amount of wind powered energy sources as some nations who had been working on the same goal for more than six times as long. Mexico had introduced auctions for energy resources and capacity that were open for foreign and domestic investment. This transaction was described by the IEA as, “one of the most sophisticated procurement mechanisms for renewable energy…” whose reach and scope “represent the most ambitious energy system transformation worldwide in recent years.” This success in the areas of solar and wind power brought by Mexico has allowed the nation to move away from more environmentally destructive means of harvesting energy.

 

The delegation of Mexico notes that it is increasingly important for other nations to act along similar veins that Mexico has. Many of its Latin American neighboring countries have adapted many of the same policies that have led to the rampant success of the Mexican clean energy initiative. This delegation sees that its template can provide both a financially operative solution to developing and developed nations and an environmentally supportive way of harvesting energy. In addition to this, many NGO’s are becoming more actively involved in supporting this cause. One such NGO is the World Wildlife Organization, which combats many of the negative results of the consumption of the fossil fuels. With this structure and vigor being applied by Mexico along with many other nations, this delegation sees no reason why a future with clean energy should be anywhere close to a far-fetched fantasy.

  • : United Mexican States
  • : Anthony D Moncman

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Country: Afghanistan

Committee: United Nations Environmental Programme

Topic: Renewable Energy

Delegate: Allyson Suandi

School: Williamston High School

Keeping in mind Sustainable Development Goal 7, by 2030, nations should turn towards renewable energy especially with the pressing climate crisis taking place. With the dwindling costs of renewable energy sources, renewable energy has become more financially feasible for developed and some developing nations. Developed nations, the main fossil fuel polluters should especially be pushing for this change to turn towards renewable energy. Developing nations should also keep in mind while creating new infrastructure to make sure that it is still environmentally friendly since there are more affordable options out there now. The climate crisis is affecting the entire world and it is especially difficult for third world countries to deal with the effects and soon the whole world will feel its wrath. 

Afghanistan is a nation with not much electricity and energy usage to begin with. This is not the worst situation ever because it has allowed Afghanistan to now invest in renewable energy sources instead since they are becoming more affordable. Originally, Afghanistan was spending almost $320 million just from importing electricity from other nations which not only is costly but also limits the job opportunities of the people of Afghanistan. The creation of renewable systems not only led to more environmentally conscious but was also less costly and created more jobs for the people and invested back into the economy. Being a landlocked nation, Afghanistan does not have very many dams, and where they do have dams they do not provide much energy. Afghanistan has looked towards implementing solar energy instead which is cheaper than most other renewable energy sources while still being efficient and is also a great investment in terms of protecting the environment and monetarily. Solar energy is used for irrigation and for agriculture in Afghanistan which also leads to an increase in agricultural and economic growth while still being sustainable. Afghanistan has launched a project called the Afghanistan Sustainable Energy for Rural Development (ASERD) where more energy efficient solar water heaters and stoves were put into place in rural homes. The ASERD has also helped to educate the people on renewable energy systems and how to use them and how they are beneficial.   

Afghanistan would like to see some sort of body oversee that will evaluate the CO2 emissions in a nation while recognizing a country’s national sovereignty. Afghanistan would like this body to evaluate the state of the nation in terms of fossil fuel usage and current financial status and from there determine the amount of funding the nation should receive from NGOs and from larger developed nations that would help some developing nations to be able to have the means to turn towards renewable energy or to inspire them to. Afghanistan does not particularly like dams and would strongly encourage for that to not be the first thing nations turn towards (especially with nations who depend on those rivers for other resources such as water and care about biodiversity). Dams mess with the flow of water and also are rather difficult to maintain and are costly, although it does prove to be a great for agriculture if the nation and is okay to turn towards if a nation is okay with the small sacrifice that using a dam creates. Solar power and wind power especially have become more cost friendly in recent years, so the change to renewable energy is not as costly as some might think. Afghanistan would prefer for nations to work towards implementing solar energy instead, especially for developing nations as it has become more affordable and is a great investment for the future. This solar energy could be used similarly to how Afghanistan used it to promote jobs and also to boost its agriculture production. Afghanistan also agrees that communities should be educated on how to use these renewable energy systems and how it helps the environment similar to what Afghanistan has in place.

 

  • : Afghanistan
  • : Allyson Suandi

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DATE: 11/10/2019

SUBMITTED TO:  UNEP

FROM:  The Socialist Republic of Vietnam. 

TOPIC:  Renewable  energy.

 

Renewable energy is the production, engineering, and use of energy using functions that create little or no greenhouse gases when in the process of generating energy.  The Renewable energy industry has seen much growth and influence in many nations across the world when confronting the prospect of climate change, and global warming. Using cleaner forms of power production and harvesting is highly regarded by most governments as the most practical way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and restore environmental integrity in the atmosphere. Our nation views the topic as a severely important issue affecting all nations and people across the globe.  The conversion from traditionally used fossil fuel sources to using more environmentally safe forms of energy production such as Wind power or solar, are investments that our government believes greatly in. Securing a cleaner and safer future for our people by providing efficient and clean energy sources in the future is one of our greatest goals. 

 

How can our nation’s government use renewable energy sources to combat climate change and issues involving every increasing carbon dioxide emissions from long-standing fossil fuel using energy industries.  What Renewable energy sources are best suited to take over the role of producing power for larger grids and cities? What Renewable Energy sources what would be best suited for lower demand and or domestic power production.  When dealing with nations whose economy is predominantly based on fossil fuel harvesting and the use of those fossil fuels for energy production, what is the best way to persuade them to convert from fossil fuel energy to cleaner, renewable sources of energy.  We have to wonder if using renewable energy sources is the most effective and efficient of combating climate change in today’s world? Is a possible agreed upon carbon tax an effective way to combat fossil fuel use and promote the use of renewable energy sources. 

A good resolution would set reasonable parameters about what kind of renewable energy sources would be the most effective and efficient when approaching the demand of power our modern day cities and industries.  It should also address the use of fossil fuel versus the use renewable energy in the global economy, recognizing what regions are more reliant on which non renewable resources and which have made bigger investments towards cleaner energy production.  A good resolution must see an agreement by most nations to make any sort of significant stride towards reducing reliance on fossil fuel use promoting the use of renewable energy sources, without damaging or causing any sort of major economic strief or public unrest.  Vietnam would like to see significant push towards a predominantly renewable energy powered energy sector in nations producing the most carbon emissions from their current energy sector. Vietnam would like to see a resolution that identifies the use of more renewable energy sources as an effective and safe way to combat ever increasing carbon dioxide emissions and global warming.  

Many nations across the globe have instituted various policies to help promote the use of more renewable energy sources in their economy.  Nations like China have significantly increased the base of their renewable energy industry in the past few decades by addressing many health concerns regarding extremely poor air quality in parts of the nation, and by meeting targets set by themselves.  Utilizing more modern technology and investing in experimental or untested renewable energy sources could turn out to be a worthy investment for every nation to help use more renewable energy sources. 

 

At the conference, my delegation will work diligently and efficient to spread the use of renewable energy sources in all nations across the globe.  We will pass a resolution that promotes the use of renewable energy sources by working with other nations to propose an agreement on investing in renewable energy plans and by setting goals to meet. 

 

  • : Vietnam
  • : Aaron Purrenhage

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It is no surprise that the resource that allows modern societies to function—an essential part of our everyday lives and a major asset to our global economy—is also a major contributor to the greatest threat to humankind’s future: climate change. For the past two centuries, energy has been sourced from fossil fuels, which have proven detrimental to our environment in the wake of climate change. To combat these dangers, we must turn to more sustainable, renewable sources—which only account for 26% of our world’s energy production as of 2018. Despite a recent spike in abnormal climate activity due to human intervention—much of which includes fossil fuel consumption—prominent nations, such as China and the United States, continue to support the growing production, consumption, and distribution of harmful energy sources such as coal, oil, and natural gas. Recent initiatives, such as the efforts to establish solar power in rural sub-Saharan Africa to promote energy equity initiated by the Global Commission to End Poverty, have been a step in the right direction, but we must continue to follow through.

            Germany has proven itself as a leader in renewable energy usage, production, and distribution. Over the next 19 years, Germany plans on closing all 84 of its coal plants, despite the fact that coal currently accounts for approximately 40% of its electricity. This refutes claims made by many large, developed nations with dynamic economies stating that they are too reliant on this carbon resource to replace it, attempting to justify their continued production and consumption of the fossil fuel. It should be recognized that the effective transition to fossil fuels requires gradual initiatives in order to avoid economic disruptions, including employment in fossil fuel plants and overall economic benefit. Germany passed the Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG) to gradually encourage renewable energy production and to promote new, sustainable jobs. EEG aimed to further advance renewable energy technologies to lower costs and increase efficiency of renewables. The Act was so successful it surpassed its goal of covering 12.5% of Germany’s electricity needs by 2020. By 2007, 14.2% of Germany’s electricity was derived from renewable sources, and the EEG was even adopted in other countries due to its success. By these figures, Germany can appropriately be deemed a model for developed nations’ renewable energy production.  Following the successful footsteps of the EEG, it is imperative that we make global initiatives to adopt advanced technologies in order to increase renewable sources’ efficiency and decrease their cost.

While this is an important component of renewable energy usage in developed nations, developing nations simply do not have the funding and resources to take this approach. There are tried and true options, such as the encouragement of wind, hydroelectric, and particularly solar power, which can promote long-term cost and energy efficiency, as communities would have access to locally produced, clean energy without having to pay the extra cost of refinement and distribution that imported fossil fuels require. This has become increasingly more feasible following renewables’ recent trends of the decreased cost of production. As of early 2018, the cost of solar energy has decreased by 73% since 2010. The gradual transition to renewable energy sources can include the conversion of oil refinery plants to wind or solar fields, as both require large amounts of land. The first is causing local—as well as global—environmentally detrimental impacts, and the second is renewable energy. In doing this, there can be a direct job turnover of any current employees of oil refineries into sustainable energy production. Because the new renewable energy plant would be in the same location, these employees would avoid unemployment, but could instead stimulate the transition and, once solar panels or wind turbines are installed, they will have the opportunity to be employed by a new, sustainable energy plant. This not only promotes the usage of renewables but also avoids disrupting citizens’ job stability, as well as solves any issues regarding land availability.

 

Works Cited

https://www.unenvironment.org/explore-topics/energy

https://www.latimes.com/world/europe/la-fg-germany-coal-power-20190126-story.html

https://yearbook.enerdata.net/renewables/renewable-in-electricity-production-share.html

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2019/sep/13/global-renewable-energy-initiative-aims-to-bring-a-billion-people-in-from-the-dark

https://wirsol.com/en/the-energy-revolution/the-german-renewable-energy-sources-act-eeg/#toggle-id-3

https://ucsusa.org/resources/barriers-renewable-energy-technologies

 

 

  • : Germany
  • : Lily Kappa

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Dominican Republic

United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP): Renewable Energy

 

Through the quick growth of the Dominican Republic up to one of the leaders of the Carribean that it is today. Through the years of growth one of the problems we have hit is increased pressure on the electrical grid, and developing it to sustain all the citizens in our country. Through this process of growing, it could also be said that the electrical side has been one thing that could be seen to hold us back. According to the UNEP 80% of the energy in the world is produced by fossil fuels. This is an unsustainable way to continue, according to the Millennium Alliance for Humanity and the Biosphere (MAHB) the Earth only has 30 years of oil, 40 years of gas, and 70 years of coal left at the rate we are currently consuming. As we go through this we look forward to a greener future using renewable energy sources to help cut greenhouse gas emissions. 

 

This topic is one that is at the center of our country currently. Through needing to develop our grid and supply ourselves with more electricity, we are looking for a way to grow. This opens up the possibility of powering the Dominican Republic through green energy. In the Dominican Republic, there is a greater demand for energy than we can supply. Because of this, our population has turned to generators and other ways of making their own power. Renewable energy is a good way to turn away from these dirty diesel generators into solar panels and turbines that can be controlled close to home, or in a large scale be used to power a whole country.  

 

In 2007 only 88% of our people had access to power. This is a number that is hopefully only going to go up. The hope is that we are able to find new ways to make energy. We hope to preserve the greenery that surrounds us and keep the earth clean.

 

Through this committee, I hope to expand the use of renewable energy throughout the world. I hope to find clean solutions to the world’s dirty energy problems. Solutions for the world will help all countries involved, and we look forward to looking for new ways to create energy, in a clean, safe way. 

  • : Dominican Republic
  • : Harrison Hill

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New Zealand

United Nations Environmental Protection: Renewable Energy

 

As the delegate representing New Zealand I will be discussing the topic of Renewable Energy. With these types of energies, they are very safe for the environment and keep burning of fossil fuels or keeping the limit of greenhouse gasses down so that the Ozone layer doesn’t keep getting ruined that would cause even more problems. But there are numerous countries that changing to this would cause problems because their way of life is based on huge power plants that renewable energies wouldn’t be strong enough to produce.

 

40 percent of the primary energy in New Zealand is renewable. Back in 2017, 82 percent of all energy produced was renewable and back in 2007 the former Prime Minister Helen Clark said she wanted to reach a national target of 90 percent of used energy to be renewable energy.

 

I would like this committee to recognize all the good that renewable energies can do for the environment but also understand that most renewable energies need certain weather conditions for them to work so they may not be the most effective way in some countries. We believe putting money into researching solar power and making it the most effective form of renewable resources that also helps with energy storage so whenever there is not enough solar power there will be plenty of reserved energy for use.

  • : New Zealand
  • : Jacob Wolfgang

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Russian Federation

UNEP

Renewable Energy

Amelia Kocis

Royal Oak High School

 

With climate change approaching quicker and quicker due to the production of greenhouse gases, the need for clean renewable energy is becoming more and more prominent. Some countries are able to jump up at this opportunity to convert their energy sources. However, some countries, while they acknowledge the need, are unable to do so. Whether this is from a lack of resources, lack of policy, lack of financial resources, or so that they can protect themselves from economic ruin. According to CIA World Factbook, 22% of energy is generated by plants using renewable energy, with 21% of this being hydroelectric. This puts Russia as 84th in the world for renewable energy. Russia is aware of the need to have more clean energy sources to prevent climate change, as we adopted the Paris Climate Accords on Tuesday October 15th, 2019.( Climate Change News)

 Despite this, converting our energy would be horrendous for our economy. As one of the main producers of oil and gas in the world, using these less clean energy sources are very important to Russia’s economy. We export 96.6 billion dollars of crude petroleum, 58.4 billion dollars of refined petroleum, and 19.8 billion dollars of petroleum gas per year.( OEC) Russia hopes that the committee can come to an agreement of actions to be taken on climate change, and the spread of renewable energy. Russia also acknowledges that there are countless less developed countries that, as much as they might care about their environmental footprint, simply don’t have the means to convert to more renewable energy sources. There are more countries, so dependent on industries based around fossil fuels, and natural gases, that any change made to energy sources would wreck their economies. Russia would support a financial aid system that acknowledges the global need for renewable energy and the economic needs of individual countries, that would provide the countries without the means, resources, or industries fit for renewable energy with those means they need to convert.

 

Russia is very excited to work with the international community to work towards a solution that will expand the use of renewable resources on a global level, protect the economies of each individual country, and will find the best possible outcome for each individual nation.

 

  • : Russian Federation
  • : Amelia Kocis

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For a nation to develop, for an economy to thrive, and for people to experience a high quality of life, energy is needed. For years the main source of energy has been fossil fuels. The reasons are obvious. These sources of energy are cost effective, accessible, and efficient. The only problem is the negative impact they have on the environment, which has led to the search for more eco-friendly ways to attain energy, or efforts towards renewable energy.

Because of our geographic attributes, Iraq has been one of the largest producers of fossil fuels. We have provided nations with energy for many years. We are a member of OPEC, are the second largest crude oil producer in the world, and have the fifth largest oil reserves. Our resources have been vital and continue to be vital to nations all over the globe.

Though Iraq plays a major role in the production of fossil fuels, we believe the effort for sources of renewable energy is very commendable. However, we also realize that renewable energy, although ideally it would, cannot possibly meet the energy needs of developed and developing nations. According to OPEC by 2040 the global energy needs will be 50% higher, due to 1.2 billion more people in need of transportation, billions of people in need of “adequate means of heating, cooking, and lighting”, and economic growth doubling. With this in mind, it is obvious that renewable energy cannot provide for all of the energy needs present, and the more practical fossil fuels become more appealing. They are the best source of energy for developing nations and nations that cannot afford exorbitant amounts of money on being environmentally conscious. Iraq proposes a middle line — a compromise that supports the environmental benefits of renewable energy and promotes its use and development while also recognizing the reality of the situation, which is that fossil fuels will continue to be vital to meeting energy needs. The solution should contribute funds towards developing ways to make them more environmentally friendly, such as technologies that could minimize the effects of burning fossil fuels.

 

Iraq hopes that a solution can be created which acknowledges that fossil fuels will be needed for the time being and will promote the development of technologies for both renewable energy and a more clean use of fossil fuels. The world’s energy needs must be met using a combination of renewable energy and fossil fuels if economies are to thrive and nations are to develop.

  • : Republic of Iraq
  • : Henry Vredevelt

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11/14/19

Submitted to: United Nations Environmental Programme

From: Rwanda

Subject: Renewable Energy

 

Most of the modern world has been using fossil fuels since 1,000 B.C. Since then the modern world has relied on fossil fuels. Fossil fuels are easy to find. There are many of them right now and they’re very efficient when used. Although fossil fuels are the most productive route, they come bearing many negative qualities.The use of so many fossil fuels is taking a toll on our earth. In the renewable energy background paper it was said that scientists have found that the burning of fossil fuels is directly linked to global warming. Not only are the fuels taking a toll on our earth but we’re using them too quickly. Researchers from Ecotricity have predicted that oil will run out in 53 years, gas will run out in 52 years and coal will run out in 150 years. 150 years seems generations away but the rate could quicken and be even sooner. 

Rwanda has already made the move towards renewable energy. In 2014 Rwanda built a Africa shaped solar field. This solar field is powering more than 15,000 homes in Rwanda. Not only is Rwanda using solar energy but in 2014 Rwanda also made a hydroelectric power station. These stations have helped provide electricity to cities that have been struck by poverty by providing a cheap for of electricity. 

The cheapest form of renewable electricity for a citizen is hydroelectric power. If countries in the United Nations were able to come together and create plants for hydroelectric power it would be cheaper for citizens. If the source is cheaper it is more likely for the citizens to keep using it. Researchers from the energy information administration have also found that keeping a wind power plant going is cheaper than keeping a coal power plant running. 

Rwanda would like to see this committee form funding for countries who are in heavy use of fossil fuels to renewable energy plants. Not only funding but programs in different countries that have found effective ways of finding the resources they need. This would make building power plants easier. Rwanda would also like to see these power plants be focused on not only the countries in heavy use of fossil fuels but in those countries that have cities with very little power, especially countries with the resources needed already there. Countries with many rivers could easily use hydroelectric power for their renewable energy. Rwanda looks forward to working with all of you in committee and is eager to devise a thorough plan for environmentally friendly and economically attainable renewable energy.

  • : Rwanda
  • : Hayden Natinsky

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United Nations Environment Programme

Renewable Energy

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Sara Plante

Forest Hills Eastern High School

 

In the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), access to electricity is critically low despite the immense potential of both non-renewable and renewable energy sources. Research done by export.gov, a program to aid US companies’ evaluations of potential international partners, reported only nine percent of the Congolese have electricity; thirty-one percent of urban areas and a scarce one percent of rural areas. Currently, ninety-six percent of domestic power is hydroelectric and produced by two dams, Inga I and Inga II. These dams are near the mouth of the Congo River. They reach only fifty percent of their power potential because of unsubstantial maintenance and neglect. As part of the same plan, designed under the former dictator of the Congo, the Inga-Kolwezi line supplies the copper mines and bypasses the communities underneath. The Congo’s non-renewable energy resources include oil, natural gas, and uranium. Renewable energy sources include hydroelectric, biomass, solar, wind, and geothermal power. 

 

 In 2014, the DRC granted permission to producers independent from the DRC’s government to develop new energy plans that utilize both non-renewable and renewable energy sources. Most funding for new energy resources comes from mining facilities that heavily rely on electricity. Universities and other academic institutions have established centers for the research of renewable resources specifically. The Government of the DRC partnered with Power Africa, a program led by the United States Agency for International Development, to enact two new government agencies: the Authority for Electricity Regulation (ARE) and the National Agency for Rural Energy Service (ANSER). They consolidate and focus the efforts of everyone to provide energy for both public and private consumption. ARE and ANSER will also be used to attract capital to invest in developing the power sector. Also, this partnership aims to support new mini-grids and solar home systems.

 

The DRC urges the United Nations to assist in plans to increase access to electricity. The goal, stated by the Embassy of the DRC, is to increase the nine percent accessibility rate to thirty-two percent by 2030. The DRC would also support plans to spread electricity generated by the Inga dams to the following countries: Gabon, Cameroon, Nigeria, Mali, Angola, Namibia, Botswana, South Africa, Chad, Libya, Sudan, Egypt, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Lesotho. To advance the power generated from the Congo River, channeled by Inga I and Inga II, the DRC would like to spend funding requested from NGOs on the restoration of turbines in the existing dams. Furthermore, the DRC envisions a partnership with the GDRC to construct Inga III which is planned to produce an estimated 4,400 megawatts. This dam is a step towards “Grand Inga”, an eight dam plan with the potential to generate roughly 40,000 megawatts. This establishment has the prospective ability to meet most of Africa’s energy needs.   

  • : Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • : Sara Plante

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United Nations Environmental Programme

Renewable Energy

Federal Republic of Somalia

Hannah Mary Bhaskaran

Forest Hills Eastern High School

 

The World Energy Outlet has discovered that even though billions of people around the world use energy in their daily lives, 16% of people have little or no access to it. Data collected by the World Bank revealed that six out of ten people in sub-Saharan Africa lack access to energy. Increasing the amount of energy generated from renewable sources is a top priority for Somalia as it could benefit our citizens and surrounding countries greatly. Climate change has become an imperative issue with the concentration of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere being at the highest its ever been in three million years. Thankfully, the declining cost of renewable energy has allowed wind and solar power to become cost-competitive with the fossil fuels that are heating our planet.

 

According to the European Union, ninety-five percent of the people living in poverty in Somalia have no electricity. We depend on using charcoal and firewood for cooking and heating. These traditional forms have negative environmental consequences by adding more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere when burned. The USAID has discovered that Somalia “ has the highest potential of any African country for onshore wind power” as more than fifty percent of Somalia experiences winds faster than six meters per second. Somalia also experiences 2,900 to 3,100 hours of sunlight per year – one of the highest daily averages of solar radiation on earth (USAID). Unfortunately, our country lacks the financial means to implement wind power and solar power. Since the deterioration of the Somalian central government in 1991, the Somalian private sector has been providing electricity services. The power sector has many challenges such as insufficiently trained labor, high cost of investment, and lack of necessary supplies. In 2018 the World Bank conducted a study in which they put together a 20-year plan to reduce costs, analyzed regulations and laws, and discovered ways to develop the sector. The Somalian government had drafted regulations, strategies and the beginning of an energy policy to gain more investment from private sectors. The European Union has assisted us greatly with the Somalia Energy and Livelihood Project which has provided us with renewable energy sources to lessen poverty. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is currently aiding us to provide our citizens with quality energy.

 

Somalia proposes that the United Nations help gain investments to put towards improving our private sectors. With the improvement of our private sectors, Somalia could implement more sources of renewable energy to benefit our people and reduce energy. We would take advantage of the strength of our winds and solar radiation. Somalia would greatly benefit from any assistance from the United Nations.

  • : Federal Republic of Somalia
  • : Hannah Bhaskaran

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United Nations Environmental Programme

Renewable Energy

Republic of Finland

Jill Pierangeli

Forest Hills Eastern High School

 

Renewable energy is the future in combating climate change and promoting a healthy earth for future generations. It is not only becoming rapidly more necessary, but also more cost-competitive with fossil fuels, making it more available to more countries. The 2016 Paris Agreement recognizes the urgency of the energy situation, and has put in place goals of increased renewable energy. Fossil fuels must be phased out of use due to their disastrous emissions of carbon dioxide. As the country with the second-highest amount of renewable energy shares in Europe, the Republic of Finland believes increased renewable energy, such as bioenergy, wind energy, hydro energy, and solar energy is the key to a healthy population and healthy world.

 

Renewable energy represents 40% of Finland’s total energy end consumption, with plans to increase that percentage to more than 50 by 2030, though it has already exceeded the 2020 goals from the European Union. The highest proportion of renewable energy is provided to the heating and cooling sector, with electricity and transport following not too far behind. The most important forms of renewable energy used in Finland are bioenergy, fuels from forest industry side streams and other wood-based fuels, hydropower, wind power, ground heat, and solar heat. Finland has put in place a feed-in tariff system to subsidize renewable electricity producers to promote renewable energy. Finland also supports the use of heat pumps, bioenergy, and solar power for spacial heating. Additionally, the Finnish government promotes wind power, specifically off-shore wind farms, by lowering tariffs on leases for sea areas and offering subsidies for wind farms. Finland is striving to reduce the carbon footprint in Finland by increasing renewable energy sources.

 

Finland recommends the committee takes similar steps in promoting renewable energy as Finland has taken. A target renewable energy percentage, like that of the EU, would be helpful in increasing renewable energy across the globe. Finland believes 30-40% would be a good goal percentage. Governments should also provide subsidies for renewable energy sources like wind power, solar power, or bioenergy. Finland also encourages a feed-in tariff system to pay users for unused renewable energy, therefore accelerating investment in renewable energy. Finland hopes the committee can come to a consensus on attainable goals that will increase renewable energy and slow or reverse the effects of climate change.

  • : Republic of Finland
  • : Jill Pierangeli

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United Nations Environmental Program

Renewable Energy 

Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Allayna Hight

Forest Hills Eastern High School

 

The carbon dioxide released from burning fossil fuels has been scientifically proven to exaggerate the greenhouse effect, make climates warmer, cause the sea level to rise, and spark abnormally destructive natural disasters. Coal, oil, and natural gas are soon to run out, and it is clear that the future is renewable energy, not fossil fuels. Clean energy is the 7th of the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals of 2014, and in order to work towards this goal, the United Nations must begin the implementation of renewable energy.

 

The Bahamas contributes very little to climate change, only making up 0.01% of total carbon pollution in 2017. Despite this, the Bahamas suffers from extreme effects that are brought on by the pollution of larger, more industrial countries. As described in an article of the United Nations news, Hurricane Dorian ravaged two islands of The Bahamas in 2019, causing 56 deaths and 600 missing persons. Prime Minister Hubert Minnis stated that hurricanes have become worse due to the imbalanced climate brought on by climate change and the use of fossil fuels; The Bahamas, along with other island nations, are at great risk. 100% of Bahamian energy consumption comes from fossil fuels: 76% oil and 26% natural gas. It is difficult to adjust to other energy sources due to low budget and means of execution. However, due to the daunting future presented by the continued use of fossil fuels, The Bahamas has decided to make changes to its energy policies where possible. Because completely discarding fossil fuels is unrealistic, the Bahamas has first turned its focus to improving efficiency and reducing waste in electricity usage. The Bahamas has partnered with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) to establish a Bahamas National Energy Policy that put goals in place for energy efficiency and modernization. Also, at the 2014 United Nations Third International Small Island Developing States (SIDS) Conference, The Bahamas signed a treaty called SIDS-DOCK, which helps financially with meeting energy efficiency and renewable energy targets. In the future, The Bahamas hopes to focus on solar energy as the most compatible renewable energy, respectively. Prime Minister Hubert Minnis opened a solar plant facility in March of 2019, and the Bahamian Government plans to eventually install solar water heaters in 30% of houses. The Bahamian Government has also reduced the import tax on solar panels from 42% to 10% to encourage the marketing of solar energy in the country.

 

The world is facing climate change, ozone layer depletion, natural disasters, and ecosystem destruction. At this time, above all, The Bahamas urges the immediate action of large, industrial nations with the most prominent carbon footprints. The Bahamas hopes that these countries who release the most greenhouse gasses will make the most effort to redesign their energy usage, moving towards the renewable energy that best suits their country. The Bahamas encourages the enlisting of renewable energy companies such as Vestas (wind), or Berkshire Hathaway Energy (solar), to aid in this difficult but necessary transition. For smaller countries with less greenhouse gas emission, The Bahamas recommends a slower approach to renewable energy by starting with efficiency first. The Bahamas hopes to see a resolution placing firm expectations on countries’ greenhouse gas emissions, with a focus on countries with the largest carbon footprints; moreover, The Bahamas expects an agreement by all countries to transition to renewable energy completely by the year 2065.

  • : Commonwealth of The Bahamas
  • : Allayna Hight

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United Nations Environmental Program

Renewable energy 

Kingdom Of Cambodia

Aastha Patel

Forest Hills Eastern High School

 

The planet is warming up and most countries are trying to use cleaner energy known as energy collected from renewable resources, such as solar panels. The United States for the first time ever in April 2019 had electricity come from clean energy instead of coal, reported by Bloomberg (news channel) “The GSR (Renewables Status Report), the report reveals that total investment in renewable energy (not including hydropower) was $288.9 billion in 2018.” Globally, more renewable energy capacity has been installed instead of new fossil fuels and nuclear capacity combined. In developing countries that are seeking to become more advanced economically and socially clean; renewable energy production has surpassed the capacity generated by fossil fuels. In 2017, renewable energy comprised 36.6% of China’s total installed electric power capacity and 26.4% of total power generation. Most countries around the world use coal because it is  efficient for producing high amounts of energy required in the industries, which makes it very hard to replace it with other energy sources. Coal consumption is the largest production, accounting for 40% of electricity worldwide. Additionally, coal is already available in most countries and is in ample supply. China who is the largest consumer and producer of coal produces 46% of global coal and consumes 49%, Which is almost as much as the rest of the world combined. (Renewable energy is also very expensive compared to coal) Crude oil is a cleaner fuel than coal but it still has many environmental disadvantages.  

Cambodia’s electricity is made up of 62% renewable energy, mostly coming from hydropower dams. Hydropower Dams were built over four years costing nearly $800 million. The dam is expected to bring in around $30 million in tax revenue yearly. Cambodia’s largest investor in developing hydroelectric dams is China. Biogas plants (Biogas is a gas mixture which is generated when organic compounds are fermented in the absence of air) are going to be installed in rural areas across Cambodia. The Hivos Foundation in collaboration with the Netherlands Development Organization, which is a non-profit international development organization, has introduced biogas installations across Cambodia with The National Biodigester Programme. Solar panels are increasingly being used in rural areas of Cambodia. Through the Rural Electrification Fund, 12,000 solar home systems have been installed in rural areas of Cambodia. All the villages of the Kingdom of Cambodia are going to have some sort of electricity, by 2020. Around the year 2030, at least 70 % of households in Cambodia will have access to grid-quality electricity.

The United Nations needs to come together to help developing countries and countries that do not use renewable energy to build biogas plants. Biogas plants will create renewable energy and produce electricity. Countries need to also install solar panels because it is a excellent alternative to replace fossil fuels. Countries that have a river to place a dam have a benefit because the water flowing is absolutely free and it is a clean fuel source renewed by snow and rainfall. It is necessary to use renewable energy because the burning of fossil fuels releases greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, increasing levels of CO2 and other gases. If we do not take action, our world’s average temperature will be too high to stop it.

 

  • : Kindom of Cambodia
  • : Aastha Patel

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Environmental

Renewable Energy

People’s Republic of China

Leah Palladino

 

Human activity is filling the atmosphere with global warming emissions and as global warming becomes more of a threat, countries look for ways to increase the use of renewable energy. To prevent the continued growth and use of harmful energy resources, it is vital that new, renewable sources of energy be implemented. In sub-Saharan Africa, however, the access to energy in general is unreliable and lacking. As we unite to improve the access of functional energy across the globe, it is essential to consider the type of energy implemented. Renewable energy, most commonly in the form of solar, wind, or hydroelectric power, is most efficient and results in exceptionally small amounts of greenhouse emissions being released. The United Nations must promote the use of renewable energy to preserve the health of all citizens and of the globe. 

 

Being the most populated country in the world, the People’s Republic of China struggles to procure enough energy to sustain economic growth. We are the largest oil importer and over the last few decades, we have been looking to diversify our energy sources. China has set aggressive goals, and today China is the leading country in the use of renewable energy as the source of electricity production. For example, in the driest mountains, we have emplaced solar panels to power cities and rural areas. It is pivotal that as a country we continue to invest in sustainable alternatives, for we currently face severe water and air pollution, and investing in clean energy technologies is an investment in decreasing the air and economic problems associated with poor air quality. China has set a variety of goals to continue to promote the use of renewable energy within our country. We hope to increase total electricity production from non-fossil fuel sources from 35 to 39 percent by 2020, and by 2030, 20 percent of our energy supply will be from non-fossil fuel sources. The International Energy Agency claims that in the next five years, about 40 percent of the global solar and wind energy will originate from China. Through these goals and our plans for electricity, we hope to foster an “ecological civilization.” With the aid of renewable energy resources, President Xi Jinping hopes to alleviate global warming, better energy efficiency, and lower pollution levels through decreased fossil fuel use. 

 

China has continued to demonstrate support for the movement away from fossil fuel-based energy, and in 2017, China invested 125.9 billion dollars towards renewable energy – nearly half of the global investment. It is important that other countries recognize the need for the shift to clean energy sources and that the United Nations acknowledges the importance of electricity reform, which in turn comes with the necessity for electricity liberalization, pricing reform, and equitable competition. We have also struggled to effectively connect energy production centers to consumption locations. China proposes that the United Nations advocate for renewable energy in both developed and underdeveloped countries. For the future, it is necessary to address the detrimental effects of fossil fuels on climate change and implement cost-efficient, clean energy throughout the globe. China looks forward to working with you and hopes for a fruitful committee experience.

  • : People's Republic of China
  • : Leah Palladino

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Environmental Programme

Renewable Energy

Trinidad and Tobago 

Megan Hearn 

Forest Hills Eastern

 

Reliable and available energy is vital to all nations development. Without access to consistent energy sources, governments cannot prosper. Multiple nations in Africa such as Niger and Sierra Leone hardly have access to any source of energy. Energy freedom would allow each nation to create reliable energy sources at their own pace. Implementing renewable energy resources to developing countries would increase the chances of economic growth. Fossil fuels should no longer be the prominent source of energy for nations, due to causing extreme pollution. Fossil fuels emit numerous air pollutants that are harmful to the environment as well as people. Many nations have plans to ban vehicles that use fossil fuels. The United Nations needs to furthermore implement ways to convert from fossil fuels to renewable energy resources.

 

Trinidad and Tobago are conscious that renewable energy sources would be a sustaining source. Switching to renewable resources would greatly affect Trinidad and Tobago economically in a negative manner. Trinidad and Tobago is a major producer of fossil fuels, causing energy prices to be extremely low for citizens. Switching to renewable energy would cause an unsuitable increase in the price of energy. Over ten percent of citizens are currently employed by natural gas and fossil fuel companies. Eighty percent of Trinidad and Tobago’s exports are fossil fuels, this is due to being the largest supplier in the Caribean. Over forty percent of Trinidad and Tobago’s GDP consists of fossil fuels. In the Western Hemisphere, Trinidad and Tobago hold the largest natural gas facility. Switching to renewable energy would be a long and economically challenging process. Trinidad and Tobago understand that fossil fuels cause pollution and legislation is presently trying to find a cost-effective way to switch.

 

Trinidad and Tobago strongly urge the United Nations to create a more efficient, cost-effective way to switch to renewable energy resources. Financially not all nations are willing nor ready to make the switch to renewable energy, especially when fossil fuels are more readily available. Financial help would cause Trinidad and Tobago to move in the renewable energy direction quicker. 

  • : Trinidad and Tobago
  • : Megan Hearn

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United Nations Environmental Program

Renewable Energy

Republic of Turkey

Natalie Robbins

Forest Hills Eastern High School

 

Due to economic and population growth, electricity demands increase by 5.5% on average per year in the Republic of Turkey. As a result, demands are expected to grow by 50% within the next decade. While Turkey has managed to triple its energy capacity in the last 15 years, we must continue to work to meet its projected demands –– and we must do so in a sustainable, environmentally friendly manner. Climate change presents an ever-present threat to Turkey, whose environment, particularly in its eastern region, is especially vulnerable to drought, heatwaves, and flooding as global warming progresses. Thus, Turkey believes that an increased and improved utilization of renewable energy is not merely an option, but a necessity.

 

While Turkey has contributed to the increasing amount of greenhouse gas emissions in the past quarter-century, we are investing in efficient and renewable energy sources in order to meet its renewable energy goal for 2023, which consists of increasing its percentage of renewable energy sources to two-thirds of its energy production. As both the Euphrates and the Tigris rivers originate in Turkey, hydroelectricity supports about a fifth of its overall energy supply, a fraction that is projected to grow to meet its goal. Solar, wind, biomass, and geothermal energy sources have been utilized as well as Turkey transitions from oil and coal-based electricity production. Turkey has also planned to integrate nuclear energy into its energy mix. Turkey does not, however, only believe in an increase in renewable energy production, but also its conservation. Another aspect of its 2023 energy goal includes reducing consumption per capita by 20%. 

 

Turkey wholeheartedly believes in a shift to renewable energy for the good of the planet, but asks for leniency from the committee for countries that still rely on nonrenewable energy, as these sources are often critical for their economic wellbeing. Turkey believes that such countries must use such energy production as a crutch in order to successfully and smoothly transition to more sustainable options, and that countries with the resources should aid in this transition. Turkey also encourages increased funding for research and technological development that will aid the global community in discovering energy production that is even more efficient and environmentally-friendly. Turkey also proposes more public campaigns and education in terms of renewable energy and proper energy consumption in order to decrease waste among the world’s citizens.

  • : Republic of Turkey
  • : Natalie Robbins

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United Nations Environmental Programme

Renewable Energy

Portugese Republic

Rachel Verbrugge

 

Renewable energy is an essential source of energy for the world because it allows people to be provided with electricity without harming the planet by emitting fossil fuels which is largely contributing to climate change. The UNEP has found that there are currently around one billion people who do not have access to any kind of electricity, and the people who do usually choose the cheap option that involves cutting down trees to burn wood for energy. Unfortunately, climate change negatively impacts people in poverty the most and they are the ones who usually don’t even have access to electricity. The United Nations established a goal of “Affordable and Clean Energy” in the Sustainable Development Goal, hoped to be achieved by the year 2030. Additionally, they made an agreement called The 2016 Paris Agreements which set goals for relying more on renewable energy like wind, water, and solar to fuel electricity in the world instead of relying on fossil fuels. Other committees in the United Nations have taken action to reduce the impacts of climate change. The UNDP encourages governments to to transform their renewable energy markets by strengthening investment in new technologies.

 

Portugal plays a major role in improving renewable energy and continues to reduce the cost and make it more available to everyone. Portugal is one of the leading countries in producing renewable energy from wind, water, and thermal power. The Institute for Nature Conservation and Forests in Portugal established regulations on vehicles and machines that harm the environment; there is a law in place to have a license to own these machines, and they are regularly checked. Many investments have been made in Portugal to increase the production of renewable energy. An organization called the Portugese Renewable Energy Association (APREN) , who works with the government, produces 90% of the renewable energy in Portugal. Because of their efforts to make it available to more people the cost of renewable energy is now much lower; the price has dropped from 43.94 €/MWh(megawatt) to 39.75 €/MWh.The APREN also works with other European countries in the EU to bring affordable renewable energy to all Europeans, they have collected data that says in portugal wind energy and hydroelectric power make up more than 50% of all electricity generated in Portugal. It is important to get other countries to make the same improvements as Portugal.

 

Portugal suggests that the UNEP requires countries to set regulations on what machines are used to avoid worsening pollution in the future. Organizations, like APREN, should be established in all countries to raise money and produce renewable energy resources to be distributed. The establishment of organizations like this will reduce the prices of renewable energy and make it more available to everyone. Additionally, funds should be donated to poorer countries like Sub-Saharan Africa, which is contributing to half of the one billion people without functioning electricity, so that these countries can have access to this cheaper, cleaner energy. If renewable energy can become affordable and accessible to the whole world, then the risk of climate change will be significantly reduced, and it won’t have harmful effects on poorer populations.

 

  • : Portugese Republic
  • : Rachel Verbrugge

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11/10/19

UNEP

South Korea

Renewable Energy

Fossil fuels have been the world’s main source of fuel for many, many decades. Fossil fuels have helped advance technology and transportation, they have also been proven to be extremely harmful to the environment. When these fuels leak they can contaminate both soil and water, as well as pollute the air. These products have been destroying many landscapes and habitats for years. Not only do fossil fuels have a negative effect on our earth, but they are also burning at a much faster pace than they are being created. If we wanted to use oil and coal as our main source of energy, we would only use them for a few years before they would be gone. 

South Korea is trying to cut way back on our use of fuel fossil and switch to different types of renewable energy. In 2018 63% of Korea’s renewable waste was solar energy. In 2030 this number should increase. South Korea is trying to eliminate fossil fuel and switch to renewable energy altogether.

 

South Korea is looking forward to working with other countries to solve the non-renewable resources crisis.

 

  • : Republic of Korea
  • : Lydia Maggi

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November 9th, 2019

From: Madagascar

Subject: Renewable Energy

Delegate: Joshua Brezenski (Royal Oak High School)

 

      In 2018, Madagascar started to expand and start using more renewable energy resources like solar panels. This is because only 15% of people have access to electricity. So Madagascar started to use renewable energy resources like hydro power and woodfuel production. The main problem is expansion of these renewable energy resources because Madagascar is among one of the poorest countries in the world. While only 15% have access to electricity, expanding renewable resources will be a problem without the necessary funding. Madagascar is working with Development of independent power producers (IPP) to help spread the energy they need. Madagascar has a large solar energy potential because of all the sunlight, they get over 2,800 hours of sunlight each year. Only 2% of hydroelectric programs are in progress and the Energy Sector Management Assistance Program (EMAP) is helping to make small projects to help this situation.

 

      With Madagascar in 2019 still remaining on fossil fuels climate change is a deadly effect, there were many droughts and floods due to climate change. The temperatures are rising and which change in rain patterns can occur, more droughts, stronger weather, and warmer oceans. Some people were on the break of starvation in 2016 because of all the droughts and destruction of crops. Over the years, Madagascar has the way using fossil fuels is affecting them with climate change. In 2013 Co2 emissions were at its highest with over 3 million tons of Co2 being produced. But now its gone down and in 2015 70.2% of Madagascar’s power consumption was with renewable energy resources. Another way people are trying to help in Madagascar is by going off the grid.

   

     But, the main problem is funding. How is Madagascar going to get the funding they need to supply renewable energy they need? Well, in June 2018 the World Bank approved 40 million dollars in funding to improve electricity. This project is called The Madagascar Electricity Sector Operations and Governance Improvement Project (EGOSIP) and JIRAMA which is a state owned electricity service. Their goal is to strengthen social and economical developments by strengthening electricity services. With more investments in JIRAMA this will help spread the reliable energy people need. The International Development Association (IDA), their job is to help the poorest countries by giving grants and zero to low interest loans for programs and projects for economic growth. 

 

     What’s the outcome of expanding electricity? Well, more people have access to the internet and this can improve businesses, healthcare, communication, and education. Electricity can help businesses by having power more services and communication inside the building like calling, printing, and ect. With people having access to communication they talk to people around the globe by contacting people they can stay in touch with family and other people. This would also improve education by adding many programs and giving them access to the internet would increase and benefits everybody’s education. The main issue is expansion but Madagascar has all the funding they need from multiple programs.

  • : Madagascar
  • : Joshua Brezenski

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Country: Brazil
Committee: ECOSOC
Topic: Renewable Energy
Delegate: Isabella Beckhorn
School: Williamston High School

 

Renewable energy has been the focus of countries around the world. Specifically in Latin America, Brazil is almost balanced on its use of renewable and non renewable energy. Thankfully, Brazil is moving towards relying less on gas and oil and more on hydroelectricity. How can we further this research and find ways to maintain energy that is beneficial to our planet? This is a question asked by engineers and scientists all over the world. 

 

Brazil has always had a large portion of their energy hydro, because it is a very water based country. Recently, Brazil committed to expand non-hydro electricity renewables to 20% by 2030. In 2013 Brazil launched a ten year project to expand energy capacity. While Brazil had a struggle with funds the following year, they eventually got back on track. Brazil is well developed in hydro and renewable that represent more than 39% of its overall internal energy supply. The EY Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness index ranked Brazil ninth out of 40 countries. It was the best ranked in Latin America.

 

Brazil thinks countries should look for better ways to create reliable energy. Starting with reduction of non-renewable energy sources. Brazil thinks these would also allow countries to prosper economically. Generating renewable energy produces no greenhouse gas because there is no use of fossil fuels. It also reduces types of air pollution, a problem in many countries major cities. Brazil believes this will help countries reduce dependence on imported fuels, though countries who trade these fossil fuels may need to remake their trade deals as unreliance could hurt their economies. Overall Brazil believes this will benefit the world as it slows down climate change and provides a more reliable source of energy.

  • : Brazil
  • : Isabella Beckhorn

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Delegate: Paige Hahn

Country: Canada

Committee: Environmental

Topic: Renewable Energy

 

The implementation of mass renewable energy is a relatively new topic for the United Nations. However, this problem has become very dangerous very quickly. Because of the lack of renewable energy technology, the majority of consumers rely on fossil fuels – such as oil, coal, and natural gas – to fill their cars up with gas, heat their homes, and generate electricity. The constantly increasing population adds to the consumption of fossil fuels. All of these substances emit gases that pollute our atmosphere and endanger the environment. Approximately 12.6 Americans are exposed to harmful emissions from these fossil fuels. Land is being destroyed to extract fossil fuels and this action ruins habitats. Nevertheless, renewable energy on a global scale could be the solution. 

The United Nations has made great progress in the cumbersome transition towards renewable energy. In the 2015 Climate Summit, the UN delegated $5 billion towards solar renewable energy in Africa. The UN also adopted 17 “Sustainable Development Goals” towards reducing the ecological footprint of humans. The seventh goal is, “To provide access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all”.  In 2016, major business and investment officials met with the UN agreed to increase investments in renewable energy, with hopes to double the amount by 2020.

Within its country, Canada has taken great steps towards a more sustainable use of energy. The majority of their electricity is generated from hydroelectric energy. Canada also uses wind, solar, and thermal energy for heat and electricity. Unfortunately, the energy used for fuels is still largely fossil fuel based. Canada would like to see increased investment and execution of renewable energy extraction in a resolution. Canada also looks forward to working with the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia on this topic.

  • : Canada
  • : Paige Hahn

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Forest Hills Central High School

People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria

United Nations Environmental Protection Committee: Renewable Energy

 

Renewable energy is known as a necessity to human life, but with this, there are still roughly one billion people all over the world who lack access to energy as a whole. While trying to come up with more ways of producing energy, there also comes climate change coming into play. Fossil fuels is one of the biggest methods of producing energy yet it is also one of the leading contributors to climate change. So this is a two in one issue; trying to find ways of producing energy for those who lack it, and climate change coming from specific energy sources.

 

The People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria has an abundance of natural resources to be used for renewable energy such as solar, wind, hydro, biomass, and geothermal energy. The Algerian economy is strongly dependent on fossil fuels’ market where 93.6% of its exports are mainly oil and natural gas. However, the market price has been drastically fluctuating which has largely impacted the economy. Due to these issues, we as Algeria are planning to switch to more “green” methods of energy.

 

While joining the committee we can assist in helping the world from the issue of climate change. We can also assist in achieving the climate goals that need to get in place so climate change does not take full force and potentially destroy all agriculture. By helping out, we will switch from the use of fossil fuels by switching to more eco-friendly energy sources. The energy sources we will be switching to are already present in our country such as solar energy, wind, and hydroelectric power. We are looking forward to working with other countries to find a common solution to the issue.

  • : Algeria
  • : Samuel Growney

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Country: Fiji

Committee: Environmental 

Topic: Renewable Energy

Delegate: Jack Schafer

School: Williamston High School

 

The world faces a crisis, that is we are running out of options to create a sustainable source of power and locomotion. The main sources of such are gas, coal, oil, and many other fossil fuels. These unsustainable practices can happen no longer. The world is fine, they say, and they are correct, but in the future that statement will be written in history books, as a mark of a moran. 

 

Fiji would proudly stand with any delegates that would be willing to fight “global warming” on many aspects, most notably renewable sources, as in the great words of  Greta “it’s not right I shouldn’t be here” Fiji agrees with Greta she shouldn’t be there because she lives across the ocean and a 16 year old girl shouldn’t be driving a boat across the ocean to give a speech the world should be stable and not need a savior like the great Greta. I urge you all to stand with fFji and Greta and create a more sustainable energy solution.

 

  • : Fiji
  • : Jack Schafer

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Country: Sweden
Committee: Environmental
Topic: Renewable Energy
Delegate: Juliana Lewis
School: Williamston High School



         The planet has been deeply impacted by the number of fossil fuels—coal, oil, and natural gas. These do substantially more harm than renewable energy sources by most measures, including air and water pollution, damage to public health, wildlife and habitat loss, water use, land use, and global warming emissions. All of these have been a cause of not being eco-friendly and responsible with our waste. Our nations could be at stake in a matter of years and we need to take action immediately to prevent further deviations on our earth. 

             Sweden has taken a massive amount of initiative to further spread the amount of renewable energy and help other countries develop a better understanding of the benefits. More than half of the energy used in Sweden comes from renewable energy sources. Sweden manages to combine high energy consumption with low carbon emissions. Renewable energy could be power generated from water, wind or the sun or any other source that is replenished through a natural process. The share of renewable energy used in Sweden keeps growing. The 2050 act with its aim of zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, will help the countries flourish. Already in 2012, the country reached the government’s 2020 target of 50 percent. For the power sector, the target is 100 percent renewable electricity production by 2040. 

            The goal that all countries should agree on is the fact that our world could be at serious risk due to these harmful energies and should be able to do something about this. Sweden supports the growth of renewable energy and encourages other countries to take a strength that they have whether it be sunlight, water, or even wind, and create a system of renewable energy to eliminate waste. Also, consider signing on to the 2050 act. Other countries that may have the same opinions are neighboring countries and places such as the US and Greece, and Sweden would like to see their support. 



  • : Sweden
  • : Juliana Lewis

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Country: El Salvador
Committee: Environmental
Topic: Renewable Energy
Delegate: Elleah Berger
School: Williamston High School

 

    It is the 21st century, yet many countries still heavily rely on non renewable energy sources, polluting the earth to fuel themselves. The switch from non renewable to renewable energy is hard and costly, but it needs to be done. Unclean and non renewable energy sources have taken many negative tolls on the environment, such as pollution of the air, water, and land, acid rain, and oil spills. A 2018 study showed that 9 out of 10 people breathe polluted air, and in 2015, 1.8 million people died due to water pollution. Unsafe water sickens about 1 billion people annually. This is a whole world problem that can be solved with the help of the United Nations and global participation and openness to solutions.

   

El Salvador has done a lot to help with water accessibility, as more than 60% of her energy comes from clean and renewable sources. El Salvador has created many power plants that use clean and renewable energy sources, and has many more underway. In February of this year, a contract was signed that guarantees legal stability for investments in the Ventus Project, which is El Salvador’s first wind park, and will cover the electricity demand of 80,000 homes. In 2017, the largest photovoltaic plant in Central America began operations in the municipality of El Rosario (La Paz), and outputs 101 megawatts, which is equal to the energy consumption of 200,000 homes. El Salvador also has many projects set for 2021 and before, like a natural gas plant in Acajutla, with a capacity of 380 megawatts, and a wind, solar, and natural gas plant that will add 624.2 megawatts to the installed capacity.

 

El Salvador has taken the necessary steps to reduce the pollution of the earth by using mainly clean and renewable energy sources, but is still trying to become more eco friendly with her energy. El Salvador encourages other countries to do the same and proposes a solution to help them do so. El Salvador feels that countries of similar status or position should learn from other countries in a similar position on how they were successful. That way, they could learn from the mistakes of the successful country and start off with what worked well. El Salvador believes that this will help countries deal with the presented problem in the quickest and best way possible. El Salvador would recommend to smaller, poorer countries like herself, to take smaller steps with the money available at the time.

  • : El Salvador
  • : Elleah Berger

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Country: Kuwait

Committee: Environmental

School: Williamston High School 

Topic: Renewable Energy

Delegate: Trucy Phan 

 

Energy and electricity should be a rudimentary part of everyday life, but unreliable access to these sources have impeded billions of people to lack functioning electricity. While it is important to expand reliable access to electricity, increasing the amount of electricity generated from renewable energy sources is also a significant issue, especially with the growing concern of climate change. Using clean, renewable energy is a crucial action that must be encouraged in order to reduce negative changes in the environment. Electricity production from nonrenewable sources, such as coal and fossil fuel, is the top greenhouse gas polluting the atmosphere. Other renewable energy sources have recently become more competitive with fossil fuels in different regions. According to a report by the IEA, demand for world electricity will increase by 70% by the year 2040 as a result of the growing economies of India, China, Africa, the Middle East and South-Easr Asia. Affordable and clean energy has become such a pressing issue that the United Nations established it as the seventh of its 17 Sustainable Development goals in 2015. The Environmental committee has the task of finding a solution that would establish affordable and clean energy for all people, .

Kuwait would like to find a solution that would provide reliable access to people in every country. However, Kuwait would like to  be able to maintain their oil reserves and sales. Kuwaits is responsible for approximately seven percent of global oil reserves and produces roughly 3.15 million barrels each day. The Kuwait Petroleum Corporation has announced that the oil companies intends to increase oil production capacity to 4 million barrels per day by 2020. As an OPEC member country, the oil and gas sector is responsible for 40 percent of Kuwait’s gross domestic product and roughly 92 percent of export revenues. Additionally, oil exports accounts for 90 percent of the government’s revenues. However, the country of Kuwait wants to meet 15 percent of its energy requirements, roughly 2000 MW, from renewable resources by 2030. The primary renewable energy source available in the country is solar and wind.  

Kuwait is interested in cooperating with other nations in the UN to find a resolution that will address the issues surrounding renewable and reliable energy sources. Because of Kuwait’s economic reliance on oil exports, a solid, plausible solution would need to accommodate for this factor. Other OPEC nations would most likely have similar opinions, as well. Kuwait supports an initiative to slowly start a process that will replace fossil-fuel infrastructure. Ideas to lower the use of non-renewable energy sources could include enforcing vehicle pollution standards or a consumer tax to unclean energy sources. Kuwait expects to work with other OPEC nations for this topic, such as Iraq, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, and Algeria.

 

 

 

  • : Kuwait
  • : Trucy Phan

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Country: Denmark

Committee: Environmental

Topic: Renewable Energy

Delegate: Ashley Moulton

School: Williamston High School

 

Fossil fuels have been the world’s main source of fuel since the early 20th century. Although they were extremely beneficial to the advancement of technology and transportation, they have been proven to be extremely harmful to the environment when used. The leakage of these fuels contaminate the soil and water, as well as pollute the air with carbon dioxide. Even the actual collecting of these products has destroyed many landscapes and habitats. Not only do fossil fuels have disastrous effects on our earth, but we are burning at a much faster pace than it is being created. Even if we wanted to use oil and coal as our main source of energy, we would not have a choice because soon, it will be gone. Because of the rapid increase in fossil fuel demand, researchers have predicted that we will run out of oil in 2050, natural gas in 2060, and coal in 2090. While this may seem far away, we need to begin adapting for the future for our species to survive.

 

Along with aiding other countries in the battle for accessible water, Demark’s State of Green also focuses on the creation of renewable energy in large areas, specifically cities and industrial plantations. The State of Green has begun to integrate renewable energy hybrid solutions that combine two or more clean energy sources (such as solar, wind, water, etc.) to not only generate energy, but also store it, to ensure a stable, efficient, low-cost energy supply that can switch smoothly between different clean sources. They have also made plans to implement sustainable and green energy specifically in heating and cooling to ensure efficient and cheap systems for everyone.

 

 

Denmark’s environmental footprint and economy have greatly benefited from the plans for renewable energy implemented by the State of Green and encourage the countries of the UN to come together and partner with the State of Green as well as brainstorm new ideas to improve the organization. With everyone’s help and participation, The UN creates a sustainable and efficient energy source that protects our planet as well as aids our economy.

 

  • : Denmark
  • : Ashley Moulton

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Country: Morocco
Committee: Environmental (ECOSOC)
Topic: Renewing Energy
Delegate: Savannah Andrews
School: Williamston High School

. In Morocco, there is a population of approximately 33.01 million people. With a total of 3,733 ktoe. With  86.1% from fossil fuels, 8.09% from hydropower and 5.7% from solar and wind. Proven recoverable reserves of coal by the end of 2011 was 82 million tonnes. Using wind as an energy source have been growing in Morocco, as the resource potential is high.

 Usage of hydropower has increased by 3.1% each year, while Morocco produces 6 ktoe of crude oil, each year increasing. Recently, Morocco has been attentive to hydroelectricity. Hydroelectric energy comes from capturing the force of moving water that is in our Earth’s rivers and oceans. We do this by using the movement of the water to spin hydraulic turbines. That generates kinetic energy, which is converted through a generator and then sent to a power grid. Since Morocco has many elevated areas such as mountains, hills etc, it is easier to devote hydroelectricity into Morocco’s “electricity industry” since most hydropower is generated from dams built on rivers and streams, often where there’s a big drop in elevation so gravity can benefact. Already existing hydro facilities in Morocco are being upgraded to be less harmful to plants, fish and wildlife.

Solar power can also be a renewable and reliable source of electricity. Morocco has ample resources for solar energy generation. The government is investing heavily in developing its solar potential with a target of having installed capacity from solar 2 GW by 2020. The framework for solar includes the Moroccan Agency for Solar Energy set up in 2010 and the Institute for Research into Renewable and Solar Energies established in 2011,  and they are already having an impact. 

In conclusion, Morocco’s target is to  ensure access to affordable, reliable, renewable and modern energy services. They are also working towards  increasing substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix and Double the rate of improvement of energy efficiency by 2030. However, the quantity of energy consumption per unit of economic output) increased from 3.4 MJ to 3.5 MJ per U.S dollar. Morocco is still working to correct and adjust electricity in Morocco.

 

  • : Morocco
  • : Savannah Andrews

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