September 16, 2019
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 In GLIMUN2019: Human Trafficking

 

In the past, human trafficking has primarily been for sexual exploitation with only a small percentage being for labor exploitation.  Recently, (January 7, 2019) the UN released a report that says human trafficking rates are on the rise. Since 2010, human trafficking rates have shown a steady increase. The International Labor Organization estimates that there are 40.3 million victims of human trafficking globally; 81% of those victims are trapped in forced labor and 75% are women and girls. Human trafficking, economically, is an enormous industry, accumulating about $150 billion worldwide. In more recent years, terrorist organizations have been using it to increase the number of victims they have as well as spread fear. They have used victims as child soldiers, forced labor and sexual slaves. With the ever-growing roles for the victims human trafficking growing as well as the amount of human trafficking, it is apparent we must take action.  However, as an international community we fail to comprehend the nuances that accompany human trafficking; Hence why actions in the past have failed to protect the victims. The UN has set up a voluntary trust fund for victims of trafficking, especially women and children. While this is a step in the right direction, the trust fund implies that the women and children victims can escape the sex trafficking in the first placce. 

 

In recent times, the international community has seen a surge in asylum seekers; Germany has seen a great increase. Germany has a comprehensive system of counselling centers for victims of human trafficking. This increase of asylum seekers has had an impact on the number of human trafficking victims receiving support.  Another issue Germany has faced in the realm of human trafficking is human trafficking for the purpose of sexual exploitation. The internet has played a great role in the recruitment process as well as a platform to advertise prostitution. The NGOs (KOK) who help to support sexual trafficking victims in Germany have reported a significant increase in victims who have been recruited through the internet. In regard to human trafficking for labor exploitation, the main aspects of it includes the building and construction industry, the hospitality trade, farming and the domestic services sector. In 2016, Germany enacted the Act to Improve Action Against Human Trafficking. This act helps to promote education and awareness of human trafficking. It has brought awareness surrounding human trafficking to an all time high. However, it is understood that more than awareness needs to happen in order to prevent and decrease the amount of human trafficking. 

 

All of these issues; however have many solutions. The first of which is to identify the most vulnerable communities to human trafficking. In the past, when the UN has identified vulnerable communities, they have enacted emergency information campaigns. This can be an effective, immediate solution for countries. However, more permanent and long-term solutions need to be considered. Seeing as technology and the internet has been a large source of recruitment for human trafficking, Germany calls upon governments to establish national-level taskforces on trafficking online that will have information and capabilities to address trafficking online. These capabilities would include the technology in order to monitor human trafficking situations. Furthermore, Technology companies can coordinate to create an industry code of conduct to combat trafficking online. Additionally, frequently visited sites can make the terms of service that prohibit human trafficking prominently visible on their sites. This will empower conscientious consumers to police the sites they visit daily.

 

 The cases of human trafficking that occur within more developed countries tend to be through online recruitment, therefore, this solution would be for more developed countries. For countries in dire need of immediate relief can use the proven successful method of the UN information campaign. The information will be put in schools, local relief centers, and town halls. Furthermore, utilizing countries who have lower human trafficking rates, we can implement their preventative systems and trainings within needy governments. This cooperation can also strengthen partnerships and coordination within the international community which can help with the persecution of human traffickers. 

 

Works Cited

“ADDRESSING RACISM CONFERENCE, NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS CALL FOR URGENT ACTION BY MEMBER STATES TO COMBAT DISCRIMINATION.” United Nations, United Nations, www.un.org/WCAR/pressreleases/rd-d41.htm.

“Durban Review Conference, 20-24 April 2009, Geneva.” United Nations, United Nations, www.un.org/en/durbanreview2009/ddpa.shtml.

Gassa, Marisa Testing Dalla. “Re-Upload Pdf.” SSRN Electronic Journal, 2018, doi:10.2139/ssrn.3243647.

“Permanent Mission of the Federal Republic of Germany to the Office of the United Nations and to the Other International Organizations Geneva.” Un.org.

“Racism: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.” Racism | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, www.unesco.org/new/en/social-and-human-sciences/themes/international-migration/glossary/racism/.

“Racism: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.” Racism | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, www.unesco.org/new/en/social-and-human-sciences/themes/international-migration/glossary/racism/.

Susannah.maio. “United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.” United Nations Launches Global Plan of Action against Human Trafficking, www.unodc.org/unodc/en/frontpage/2010/September/un-launches-global-plan-of-action-against-human-trafficking.html.

“Technology & Human Trafficking.” Technology Human Trafficking, technologyandtrafficking.usc.edu/report/future-action-for-trafficking-online/.

“Why Is Human Trafficking So Difficult to Stop?” Kinship United, kinshipunited.org/why-is-human-trafficking-so-difficult-to-stop/.

“Xenophobia: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.” Xenophobia | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, www.unesco.org/new/en/social-and-human-sciences/themes/international-migration/glossary/xenophobia/.

“Xenophobia: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.” Xenophobia | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, www.unesco.org/new/en/social-and-human-sciences/themes/international-migration/glossary/xenophobia/.

 

  • Germany
  • Hannah Wise

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