September 16, 2019
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 In GLIMUN2019: International Drug Trade

Committee: Special Political Committee

Topic: International Drug Trade & Libya

Country: Costa Rica

 

For the last couple of decades, the International Drug Trade has become a huge problem in many countries. Drug trafficking is a global illicit trade involving the cultivation, manufacture, distribution and sale of substances which are subject to drug prohibition laws. Crime groups involved in drug trafficking are typically involved in a range of criminal activity, so action against drug trafficking can simultaneously impact illegal firearms, human trafficking, modern slavery, production of false documentation etc. The U.S. government has spent over $1 trillion on counter-narcotics efforts, both domestically and in Latin America and the Caribbean, since declaring a “war on drugs” in the 1970s. I will be talking about Costa Rica’s position on this topic and incorporate their feelings of Libya. 

To start of this paper, I would like to talk about Costa Rica and Libya. Honestly, there is not much relation between these two countries. Back in 2011, the Costa Rican government issued an official statement supporting military actions against Moammar Gadhafi forces in Libya. According to the document, Costa Rica backs any effort required to protect Libyan citizens, including the latest resolution issued by the Security Council of the United Nations to create a no-fly zone in the country. “Costa Rica believes that governments have the responsibility of protecting civilians in case of conflicts. In the Libyan case, [Costa Rica] strongly condemns the severe violations against human rights and international laws perpetrated by the Gadhafi regime against unarmed citizens” (Document). Not only does Costa Rica have this problem with Libya, but many other Latin American Governments do as well.

 

Furthermore, Costa Rica also has many opinions about drugs and the drug trade. Drug trafficking is a global illicit trade involving the cultivation, manufacture, distribution and sale of substances which are subject to drug prohibition laws. Drugs and drug trafficking have been blamed for the increased violence, and it’s not clear the government can mount an effective response. Michael Soto, the deputy director of Costa Rica’s judicial investigation body, said 48% of the deaths stemmed from gang violence, while 25% were related to drug trafficking. It has become a huge problem in the country. Costa Rican security officials have said they are not able to stop drug traffickers from making use of their territory. Hopefully we can create some kind of resolution to this huge dilemma for Costa Rica.

 

  • Costa Rica
  • Dahai Yonas

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